This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
NEWS


Rail Technology Magazine is proud to announce details of its editorial board, comprising senior industry fi gures who have been advising on our content, contributing to the publication, and discussing some of the biggest trends and issues.


Our board, many of whom attended the inaugural meeting in March this year, comprises:


We trust that few of these people need any introduction. Readers can look forward to seeing their infl uence on the magazine, and direct contributions, in our future editions.


Andy Mitchell Programme Director Crossrail


Lord Tony Berkeley Chairman Rail Freight Group


Howard Smith Chief Operating Offi cer London Rail, TfL


Neil Andrew


Head of Systems & Tech Balfour Beatty Rail


John Glover


Institution of Railway Operators


Prof Felix Schmid Centre for Railway Research and


Education, University of Birmingham


Sir Roy McNulty gave the keynote speech on the closing day of the Railtex conference, but was bar- racked by RMT members includ- ing Bob Crow for his report’s rec- ommendations on workers’ pay and for “ignoring” the effects of privatisation.


Sir Roy spoke to a packed semi- nar theatre on June 16 about his value-for-money report and the urgent need to bring down the costs of the industry, repeating his warning on the disproportion- ate cost to the taxpayer of the re- gional network.


But he praised the industry for getting its act together so quickly in forming the Rail Delivery Group, which he will work with over the coming months to


ensure his 4 | rail technology magazine Jun/Jul 11


recommendations are carried through.


He said: “Many people in the in- dustry are ready for change.


“I’ve found it very encouraging that they are clearly picking this up; much faster, to be honest, than I expected. The RDG had its fi rst meeting last week and the Government has already begun to develop its plans, and I’m quite sure that the project plans will have been developed by the au- tumn. Overall I’m very encouraged so far by the response.”


But in the Q&A session after the speech, Crow, stood at the back, said: “You’re persecuting railway workers. Under your report, rail- way workers for the foreseeable


future will not be able to increase their living standards.”


Counting the costs


“Why have costs gone up?” Crow continued. “Up until the mid- 1990s, the railways were national- ised. You talk about European rail- ways – they are still state-owned. That’s the difference. You’ve got no conclusion on that whatsoever.”


He also criticised the RDG for its lack of worker and passenger rep- resentation.


Sir Roy told him that there needed to be pay restraint at every level of the industry. He said Crow and other unions leaders had done a “terrifi c job for your members” in raising wages so fast, but he said


“that has not been earned in pro- ductivity”.


He added: “We can’t go on with pay increases at the level they have been for the past 10 years. It’s not a matter of persecuting workers, but of looking at the eco- nomic costs of the industry.”


He later said the upheaval that would be created by re-national- ising or completely privatising the railways would further add to the network’s cost.


Bob Crow


Sir Roy McNulty


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116