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RAILTEX 2011


All photos © Paul Bigland Adam Hewitt reports from this year’s Railtex event at Earls Court, London. R


ailtex 2011 saw 424 exhibitors show- case their products and services to


around 9,200 rail industry visitors, deci- sion-makers and commentators.


Some of the most important fi gures in rail addressed Railtex 2011, including Trans- port Secretary Philip Hammond, Network Rail chairman Rick Haythornthwaite, and author of the recent value-for-money study, Sir Roy McNulty.


There were also presentations and talks from many Network Rail, independent and commercial experts on the latest trends and projects, many of which receive exten- sive coverage within this edition of RTM.


Network Rail had a large and well-attend- ed stand at the show. David McLoughlin, fi nance and commercial director of invest- ment projects for Network Rail, told RTM: “Railtex was really positive for us and


many visiting our stand commented on the positive change in Network Rail. With stakeholders and suppliers attending from across the industry, including many sub- contractors that we don’t get to engage with very often, it gave us a fantastic op- portunity to communicate our key message of improved partnering.”


The programme of events featured a sig- nifi cant presentation by Network Rail’s di- rector of investment projects, Simon Kirby, on the company’s new approach to supplier engagement. For more on that speech and


Transport Secretary Philip Ham- mond, addressing Railtex, said: “When I took over this brief just over a year ago, I set out the Coa- lition’s twin objectives for trans- port: supporting economic growth and delivering carbon reduction.


“It is clear to me that rail can contribute fundamentally to the achievement of both of these agendas, with the potential to become the mode of choice for inter-city journeys in particular.


“The importance of infrastructure investment in the Government’s growth strategy, and transport’s role in it, was refl ected in a spend- ing review settlement for the De- partment for Transport that I think far exceeded the expectations of most people in the industry.


“Over the next four years, we will invest over £30bn in transport projects right across Britain, with £18bn committed to the railways to complete the


22 | rail technology magazine Jun/Jul 11


Crossrail project and support the upgrade of London Underground, to deliver Thameslink by 2018, for electrifi cation of the Great Western Main Line and of key lines in the North West of England and the Intercity Express Programme, a project that will generate 500 manufacturing jobs in the north east and restore train building to the industry’s birth place.


“We’ve given the go-ahead to the long-awaited Ordsall Chord


in Manchester, the redoubling of the line between Swindon and Kemble, and we’ve confi rmed the purchase of over 2,000 new rail vehicles for Thameslink, Crossrail and other franchises as well as the cascading of hundreds more.


“At a time when every penny of public spending is under the microscope, this investment represents a very signifi cant commitment by the government to the future of rail in this country.”


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