This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LONDON UNDERGROUND & OVERGROUND


cial in taking passengers out of central Lon- don. I live near Richmond, so the journey I talk about is Richmond to Highbury & Islington.


“The way to do that until very recently would have been to go up to Vauxhall, on a crowded South West Trains service, and then go on the Victoria Line through the most crowded part of central London in the peak. Now, with an upgraded and more frequent NLL, it’s far more sensible to go round the orbital network.


“It’s good for passengers, but the orbital network is also incredibly useful in terms of decongesting some very busy and expen- sive-to-work-on parts of the Tube network, and the inner London rail network.”


People, people, everywhere


“You could almost fi ll any train that you can put onto the Orbital network,” Smith con- tinues. “The fl ows that you can divert, if you can get just a fraction of the fl ows of people making their way into central London and crossing it, well, your trains look very full.


ing thousands of people into and out of the Olympic site at Stratford.”


Standing room only?


In most other parts of the country, such rapid increases in capacity and service frequency would be with one eye on the future, with the understanding that there would empty seats in the short term.


Smith said: “The extra capacity we’re put- ting in is to deal with the growth we foresee in the short term – you always want more passengers, and there’s always a balance to be struck. At one stage there was a very grandiose and more expensive plan for upgrading the ELL that gave us eight-car trains. Eight-car trains would be lovely, but the question is, do you wait until you’ve got a scheme that gives you eight-car trains, or do you do the one we did? The answer is, we very successfully have done what we have done, and now we’ve got to look at how we increase the frequency or the length of trains.


“The other characteristic of the orbital Overground lines is that they’ve got al- most infi nite latent demand. So many of the journeys you can make on Overground have very close comparators with journeys where the alternative is to travel across London. It’s therefore enormously benefi -


Finding the money


Despite the money being spent, no budget is infi - nite, and the grandest plans to overhaul Highbury & Islington station, for example, had to be scaled back.


Smith told us: “Although we serve it quite substan- tially with our services, it’s technically an LU station, so they’ve led on the works there. What has been done is the Overground tracks upstairs were slewed over to create the new space for the ELL, so we’ve now got four platforms for Overground, two terminat- ing round from the ELL, and two through-platforms, where there were previously just the two through- platforms. Upstairs, LU has built and opened their new control centre which allowed us to make the most of the new station and control the information systems.


“What isn’t likely to go ahead, because of the cost, is making the station step-free by opening up the old station over the other side of the road, and using that to sink a shaft down to the Victoria line platforms. That, frankly, is just too expensive. We’re delight- ed with the settlement we got in terms of allowing Crossrail to go ahead, to do the Overground, and do the Tube upgrades as well; but the money for that upgrade at Highbury & Islington just can’t be found.”


“Those people, physically, can’t have been there eight weeks ago because they couldn’t have got on the trains that were being run. The ability to switch people across and get them onto something they fi nd attractive and frequent is heartening but also slightly frightening if you’re trying to manage ca- pacity!”


London Overground is also an unusual ex- ample of line and track infrastructure up- grades accompanied by station refurbish- ments and new rolling stock.


Smith said: “That’s something that hasn’t been done properly, you might say, since the days of Network SouthEast, who used to do total route mod- ernisation. There are some real benefi ts of bringing all the as- pects up at the same time.”


Howard Smith


FOR MORE INFORMATION Visit www.tfl .gov.uk


rail technology magazine Jun/Jul 11 | 65


“The other example is the West London Line – I was on that this morning – and up until a couple of months ago we were run- ning two trains an hour and three in the peak. We’re now running four; Southern run their two or three on top of that – and if you were at Shepherd’s Bush this morning, you’d see that every single one of them was coming in full.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116