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FOCUS


Protection options


In part two of his article, Adrian Simmonds gives an overview of suppression options for waste piles of varying heights


B


low level automatic sprinklers Waterspray/watermist


UILDINGS ARE being constructed ever taller – often over 12m and up to 20m (‘lofty’ in insurance terms). With waste piles typically being managed to 4m to 6m high, roof level sprinklers don’t necessarily provide fully effective fire protection for the waste itself. Among the number of localised fi re suppression approaches that are being deployed across the waste handling industry to detect and attack a fire in the very early stages are the following: • deluge waterspray or watermist • monitor nozzles (aka water cannons) •


of 10mm/min (10 litres per m2 per minute)


or more over the area being protected. Care needs to be taken though that the demand from the largest single deluge zone, or perhaps two adjacent zones, does not exceed the capacity of the fire pumps. Typically, 20 to 30 nozzles operating simultaneously will be the limit for the fi re pump arrangement, plus allowance for any attached fire hydrants, fire hoses or roof sprinklers above. Activating deluge waterspray systems


Water based deluge systems can be installed using open head waterspray or watermist nozzles positioned around the top edges of the waste bunker walls, or suspended from the roof structure above the waste bunkers.


Deluge waterspray systems These systems are often connected to existing standard sprinkler fi re pump tanks. Fitted with ‘standard’ open head sprinkler type nozzles, they need to be designed to deliver a density


is most effective if done automatically using fl ame detectors, but for sites occupied 24 hours a day, seven days a week, an acceptable alternative is to use motorised deluge valves. These are operated remotely via manual push buttons located in the control room, from where the supervisor oversees the site using CCTV or direct line of sight. As soon as the supervisor gets a fi re alarm or


a ‘fi re call’ for a particular waste bay, they can activate the correct deluge system and attack the fi re immediately. All deluge nozzles discharge water simultaneously from multiple directions around a bunker, attacking and suppressing a growing fi re quickly and effectively. The greatest challenge with deluge waterspray systems right now is containment


46 DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 www.frmjournal.com


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