search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FOCUS


Modelling applications


represents higher concentrations, and the lighter lower. There is still a likelihood of material being present in areas not marked, and if the pollutant is extremely toxic, or released in large quantities, areas outside the ‘low risk’ region might in fact still be quite dangerous. FireMet is a much simpler, password


protected, web based system for fire and rescue services, and is not available to other users. It provides a quicker response than CHEMET, and includes three hours’ forecast information. The output shows wind direction and sectors at risk, which are coloured red. FireMet achieves a faster response than


CHEMET by taking wind information from the operational forecast model running at the Met Offi ce in Exeter and simply marking an area at risk downwind from the release. It is not a dispersion model, but more like an automated version of the LAESI advice. The only input from the user is a location in the form of a postcode or Ordnance Survey grid reference.


Future developments


Developments in both new designs of wind instruments and the increasing power of computers mean that it is now possible for a simple dispersion model to run continuously on perfectly ordinary PCs. The basic system, marketed under the name Plumecast, uses real time measurements updated every second, and is installed as a package including a quality wind sensor. Fast sampling periods are essential, as


this gives Plumecast real measurements of turbulence, something that would otherwise be estimated – a source of error and a heavy drain on computer processing. This data is stored and processed to calculate an ‘area at risk’, also every second. The resultant information can be transmitted and displayed overlaid on a map in any suitable location. It could even be available in the cab of


an emergency services vehicle en route to an incident. The only requirement is that real time wind data, of suitable quality and representative of the risk area, is available. This model


Figure 6: A Plumecast display showing the area at risk from a plume and the current location of an emission in progress. This information is available in real time and easily distributed.


20 DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 www.frmjournal.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60