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Current affairs


Cleaning regimes


To combat such daily risks, effective kitchen management regimes – involving regularised cleansing and other operational diligence procedures designed to enhance safety – should be backed up by efficiently maintained cleaning records and relevant documentation in relation to the cleaning methodology adopted/implemented, as a first step towards demonstrating fire risk assessment procedures that are legally required under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 [FSO]. In this risk assessment process, areas that may


have been missed or under considered – such as the cook line, cooking appliances and paths heading away from the canopy above the cook line – may present a first risk and primary source of fire. The extract system, for example, may pose a hidden fire load through deposits that have built up along the full length of ductwork. Yet equipment friendly extinguishing agents


in appropriately specified and correctly installed and maintained fire suppression systems will enable premises to deal with a fire successfully and clean up quickly afterwards, thereby preventing or reducing the risk of injury, property damage and minimising business interruption, including important customer confidence and word of mouth implications for future brand reputation on social media etc. New monitoring systems are also available


which remotely measure grease build up in ducts and report back these measurements, effectively


acting as a ‘sleeping policeman’ and further reducing any risk of fire developing.


User confidence


Given the potential to harness all of these positive factors and help to effectively minimise both the number and extent of commercial kitchen fires, BAFE has acted to ensure that the capabilities of suppression systems can be used in tandem with these cleaning procedures by end users. This third party certification audit process for providers of kitchen fire protection systems and associated fire detection places the demonstration of competence as a key criterion. Customers will be able to select the right contractor, who understands how the equipment works and has a proven track record of its use. It is important that end users recognise their legislative responsibilities under the FSO, to ensure that competent engineers and maintenance companies install and maintain kitchen fire protection systems. That work must not be handled by companies whose claimed competence is unproven. For example, a maintenance provider working on other fire protection equipment may erroneously claim to be capable of handling these systems too. Fire protection products and related


services should be fit for purpose, and properly installed and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions or a relevant standard. Third party certification schemes evidence that the chosen provider has been


42 DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019 www.frmjournal.com


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