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Modelling applications


• the most commonly recorded room of fire origin for accidental domestic premises fires was the kitchen (23,251), followed by lounge/dining room areas (3,461) and then bedrooms (3,315)


• cooking appliances were identified as the majority source of ignition of recorded accidental dwelling fires (52%)


Significantly, the guidance in both BS 9991 and Approved Document B of the Building Regulations (ADB) recommends that the cooking appliance be located remote from the final exit, which suggests that the guidance is concerned with the impact of thermal radiation on occupants as they make their escape through open plan apartments – an important consideration. When considering how occupants are to escape and the likely route they will take,


for assessing exposure to thermal radiation hazards, it is important to consider the following factors.


Travel distance The egress path on which occupants would make their escape should be considered to adequately capture the time of exposure to the higher thermal radiation heat fluxes, which will occur at those exposure locations which are closest to the ‘hob’. The width of an individual should be considered along the escape route. In addition, the behaviour of individuals


may need to be considered. For example, children or vulnerable family members could be asleep in a separate room, and adults may reasonably be expected to make their way between bedrooms to alert them, before then proceeding to escape.


FOCUS


Figure 1: Example of an escape route through an open plan apartment.


www.frmjournal.com DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019


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