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Modelling applications


fire hazard in the kitchen) in relation to the final exit from the apartment. The location of the hob will influence the dispersal of radiation from the hob fire. If the hob is in the corner of the room, the radiation reflecting from the surrounding walls will intensify the radiation received by the occupants during their escape. This is compared to a situation where


the hob was located on a centralised island with no surrounding surfaces near to reflect off. Arup has undertaken FDS modelling to investigate the impact of the following different room configurations on received radiative heat flux: • ‘no walls’ – the hob is located away from any walls (ie island cooker)


• ‘1 wall’ – the hob is located adjacent to the centre of a wall


• ‘2 walls’ – the hob is located at the corner of a room, at varying distances from the corner


The following assumptions were used in the FDS modelling: • semi infinite boundaries • walls assumed as indicative materials (ie gypsum board) radiation angles increased • height of hob set at 1.6m





Figure 2 provides an image of the hob fire scenario modelled. The graphical results illustrate the values of received heat flux recorded at several distances from the hob, over the given floor to ceiling heights. The modelling results illustrated in Figure 3 (see page 26) are in graphical form of received heat flux radiation at a height of 1.6m. The results indicate a significant increase in


FOCUS


Figure 2 (both pictures): FDS predictions for the received radiative heat flux at varying heights.


www.frmjournal.com DECEMBER 2018/JANUARY 2019


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