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EXHIBITOR PROFILE HILTI


Hilti is particularly excited about its TE 2000-AVR breaker.


STAND B60


Connect with Hilti


Once again, the power tool manufacturer has chosen the Show as the ideal platform for launching its latest products for the hire industry. Alan Guthrie reports.


Making connections will be the overall theme of Hilti’s stand, reflecting the name of a new app that the manufacturer is introducing, as well as the aim of developing and strengthening business relationships with hirers.


The DCH 300-X electric saw is designed for wet cutting.


The Hilti Connect app uses near field communication (NFC) tags placed inside a tool to read details about the product held on the internet and


accessed via a smartphone or mobile device. “Hirers may have software systems that record who has hired an item and information about their location, but the app provides data on that specific tool when it is in use or returned,” says Mark Fort, Hilti’s Data Analysis Manager - Tool Hire. “It shows its service and repair history, and allows the technician to schedule collection of the product by Hilti for maintenance. It also provides access to instructional videos on correct operation and suggests related equipment and consumables that could be used.” All new tools are now fitted with NFC tags and they are being retro-fitted to items received at Hilti’s national service centre in Glasgow.


New products on show will include the DD-WMS 100 water management system which is compatible with all Hilti diamond drilling equipment. It is designed to suppress dust at the point of contact and has an integral 14-litre reservoir that can collect and recycle the water up to seven times for cleaner, more efficient working. Also on display will be the new DCH 300-X, a variant of the existing, DCH 300 electric concrete saw, which Hilti has developed for operation with water for up to 30% faster operation. It offers a maximum cutting depth of 120mm, enabling it to cut through standard bricks and concrete blocks with a 10mm render.


A new version of the TE 30-AVR combi hammer effectively replaces four different models, namely the TE-30, the TE 30C for chiselling,


The versatile TE 30-AVR combi hammer.


the multi-purpose TE30M and the larger TE 40 owing to its greater power. It offers lower vibration thanks to a ‘decoupled’ handle isolated from the main body and is lighter in weight.


Hilti is particularly excited about the TE 2000-AVR, a 14.5kg breaker which is claimed to offer similar performance to that of other comparable 30kg-class models, while the existing TE 3000-AVR is said to rival the performance of hydraulic and pneumatic breakers. “Users benefit from a tool that is less than half the weight of some others for better handling,” says Mark Fort. “It has a T-handle design and its vibration rating of 4.8m/s2


means it can be used throughout


an eight-hour working day. It has a detachable power cord and can be connected to a dust vacuum.”


Other products to look out for include the TE 300-A36 which the manufacturer describes as a cordless breaker powered by a 36V 5.2Ah battery. It offers single impact energy of 3.6 Joules and is said to be suitable for tasks like corrective chiselling or opening service penetrations in concrete more quickly than with a conventional combi hammer.


The SB 4-A22 is the manufacturer’s first cordless band saw.


Visitors to the Show will be able to see the new SF 10W-A22 ATC cordless drill/driver which has Hilti’s Active Torque Control to prevent wrist injuries if the tool should jam in operation. The company says this reflects the greater power now available from battery technology. Completing the stand line-up is the SB 4-A22 cordless band saw, the first product of this type that Hilti has offered. It can cut pipes and profiles of up to 63.5mm and the manufacturer believes that plumbers and other tradesmen will appreciate its quiet, cold cutting capabilities with no sparking.


• 0800 886 100 51 www.hilti.co.uk


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