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EXHIBITOR PROFILE BGG UK continued


In a conventional generator, the engine runs at a constant rated speed and drives a fan to maintain air flow to keep it cool, at a level to withstand extreme operating conditions. In water-cooled systems, thermostatic valves open at a pre-set limit to release more coolant. This is inefficient, wasting fuel and increasing emissions.


“The system developed for Fusteq generators reverses this,” Renato Bruno told EHN. “The flow of coolant is kept constant and the air flow is varied to meet the load on the generator. So at 50% of loading, a smaller air flow is required to maintain the desired temperature, giving less noise, reduced fuel consumption and less noise. This variable speed inverter (VSi) technology enables us to house the generator in a more compact enclosure, giving cost savings in transportation. Reduced air flow also minimises the intake of dust and moisture, extending the life of the alternator and other components.” The first Fusteq model was launched two years ago and the range now spans from 10kvA to 1,250kVA.


They have compact dimensions, enabling up to 20 of the static models to be loaded onto a standard truck. These are complemented by hybrid versions with Lithium-ion batteries, called the LiOnLight-RT and LiOnLight-ST. They utilise 48V DC power and give up to 270 hours’ use before refuelling is needed. Chris Archer of BGG UK believes the hybrid machines are ideal for events, as the batteries can be charged up beforehand and then used for noise-free operation, giving up to ten hours of illumination.


The static SiteLight-ST lighting tower. Remote monitoring


The PK9HQ is a hybrid generator developed principally for use by the mobile communications industry in remote locations. It again runs off 48V DC power and the Lithium-ion battery can be charged by the diesel engine or via solar panels or small wind turbines. This machine, like others, can benefit from Bruno’s RFM (remote fleet monitoring) systems that enable it to be switched on and off remotely, as well as enabling site managers to view various operational parameters.


The hybrid LiOnLight machines will be promoted at the Show.


Renato Bruno also highlights the benefits that two new technologies, LED lamps and Lithium-ion batteries, can bring when used in combination on lighting towers. “LED lights dramatically reduce power consumption and extend the life of batteries on hybrid machines, almost to the extent that they could outlast the life of the engine. However, any surplus power can be used to charge the battery, which can then power the lights, increasing the life of the engine considerably and prolonging the life of machines in hire fleets. Again, this reduces fuel costs, emissions and noise, and extends service intervals. The LED bulbs give light instantly and do not need to cool before switching on again.”


Optimising new technologies


Optimising the use of new technologies is one reason why the Bruno Group has invested in facilities to develop battery management systems in-house. The company states that, correctly managed, Lithium-ion batteries can be discharged down to a greater depth before re-charging is required compared against lead-acid batteries. Overall life is extended, giving whole-life cost savings.


Such developments are apparent in several of the company’s latest products. These include the SiteLight, available in road-tow and static versions, with a 9m vertical mast and four 240W LED lamp heads.


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Other new introductions include the eco-friendly LightBox static lighting tower which has LED lamps, providing an output of 1,040W and which uses 4bV DC power. Also new is the trolley-mounted EasyLight, which runs purely off battery power. It incorporates a 5m pneumatic mast that is pumped up manually by the operator. The machine provides up to 30 hours of illumination from its two 300W lamp heads, and it can be used indoors or in areas such as tunnels where emission-free operation is required.


• 01255 830355 www.bgguk.com


The battery-powered EasyLight can be used in indoor locations.


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