This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
EXECUTIVE REPORT


Launched ten years ago, the Cesar


security and registration scheme has helped reduce plant theft.


Focus on fraud


Nick Johnson reports from the recent CITS Conference on the latest initiative to help combat plant theft, and the growing threats from fraud and cybercrime.


The recent CITS (Combined Industries Theft Solutions) Conference was different to many of its predecessors in two ways. Firstly it had a new venue, namely the London HQ of NatWest, and secondly because the main theme was the problem of fraud rather than the unauthorised removal of plant.


CITS is a not-for-profit body that was formed to tackle the problem of plant theft. However, now it is also busy alerting companies in the construction and plant industries on the urgent need for them to be aware of, and combat, the rising threat of fraud.


During his opening remarks, Chairman David Smith stated that fraud has become the ‘elephant in the room’, which people often do not want to talk about or act on. He contends that too many companies, particularly smaller ones, think that machine security is of paramount importance, whereas if their IT systems lack the latest security protection, they can be at risk of much greater financial loss.


Criminal groups


David Smith explained that the industry has witnessed a rise in fraud and attempted fraud. This ranges from an opportunist attempting identity fraud, to a disgruntled staff member passing on company protocols to a criminal group, or a gang sending emails that contain malware to extort money.


All it can take for criminals to succeed in this digital age is for an employee in the targeted company to have a momentary lapse of concentration and inadvertently tap a computer key. So there is the need to be proactive: be aware of threats, ask obvious questions, carry out rudimentary checks (especially every email sender’s address), have robust procedures, have regularly updated secure computer passwords and install the latest anti-virus and computer system security updates.


Free publications on cybercrime and fraud prevention were highlighted at the Conference.


37


The Home Office estimates that serious and organised crime costs the UK at least £24bn a year. And The Office for National Statistics suggests that, in the year ending June 2017, there were 3.3m fraud offences, of which 1.9m were cyber-related, and an additional 1.6m incidents of 'computer misuse'.


Tim France, the Head of the Home Office’s Fraud Team, said it is not possible for any one body or organisation to tackle the entirety of fraud and it requires a multi-agency, multi-partnership response. Schemes in place to help combat the threats include the Joint Fraud Taskforce and Take Five.


Understanding the threats


Steve Rodhouse, Deputy Assistant Commissioner at the Metropolitan Police, revealed that fraud now far outweighs traditional crimes such as burglary. He said, “It is very important to report any fraud or attempted fraud as it helps us understand the threats and build solutions.” So notify any fraud to the now improved UK national reporting centre at www.actionfraud.police.uk (T: 0300 123 2040).


The Metropolitan Police has set up Operation Falcon (standing for fraud and linked crime on line) to help combat the most serious threats. At the Conference, DCI Gary Miles urged individuals and companies to ensure their computer software is always up-to-date with the latest security systems. He also advised on having robust passwords - not using dictionary words, always backing up data and ensuring that computer system access is immediately terminated for employees who leave the company.


Essential knowledge can be obtained from publications such as The Little Leaflet of Cyber Mistakes, The Little Book of Cyber Scams and the Little Book of Big Scams from the Metropolitan Police (T: 020 7230 1228) and the leaflet Take Five to Stop Fraud (visit https://takefive-stopfraud.org.uk/).


Internal fraud


Nicola Cobb, the Director of Risk Consulting at KMPG, highlighted issues relating to internal fraud and corruption within a business. She recommends having tight controls and a good ‘whistle blowing’ procedure. Chris Diogenous, Chief Information Officer of the London Digital Security Centre, added, “Cyber security needs to be brought up at board level. It is not an IT issue because the impact is not just financial loss and reputational loss. If something did go wrong, what would you do? Do you have the right policies in place? Does your


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106