This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
SEE US ON STAND D100


7 & 8 February 2018 RICOH ARENA, COVENTRY


executivehireshow.com


The respirable dust particles of crystalline silica are so small (0.1–5.0 µm) that a dust extractor with a HEPA H13 fi lter is needed.


NEW DUST AND SLURRY SYSTEMS BY HUSQVARNA


Your customers work at sites where the air surrounding them could contain substances that are harmful if inhaled, even in small amounts. For instance, dust from cutting, drilling or grinding concrete, brick and similar building materials contain crystalline silica, which is hazardous if the very small (respirable) particles are inhaled. These tiny little silica particles can hover in the air for hours, invisible to the naked eye.


That’s why many authorities have implemented rules and regulations for exposure limits. With the right knowledge and equipment, it’s not complicated to protect your customers from inhaling harmful dust. The trick is to always use equipment and work methods that capture the dust directly at the source and prevent it from becoming airborne. With Husqvarna’s new leading edge system solutions, you can be sure that concrete dust and slurry is handled in a safer, cleaner and more efficient way.


Read more about concrete dust, why it can be harmful and how to protect your customers at www.husqvarnacp.co.uk or contact your Husqvarna representative today!


HUSQVARNA CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS UK Tel: 0844 844 4570* - Web: www.husqvarnacp.co.uk - Email: husqvarna.construction@husqvarna.co.uk


Copyright © 2017 Husqvarna AB (publ). All rights reserved. * Calls cost 7p per minute from a BT landline, charges from other operators will vary and calls from mobiles will cost considerably more.


LEADING-EDGE SOLUTIONS FOR A BETTER WAY OF WORKING


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106