search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Shopfloor


FOCUS: TRAINING


The future of retailer embrace a gro


It’s never been more important for shopfloor staff to be on their a-game when c ERT speaks to industry experts about the importance of seeking out professional, tail


34


Complacency is a killer of business By Paul Laville, Managing Director, T21 Group


So this Summer we enjoyed the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, and one thing that never fails to impress me when I’m watching these games is the mindset of the competitors. With rare exception, they are dedicated to making the most of their moment and smashing through terrific physical and mental barriers to compete at their best level and win. Mindset isn’t exclusive to the world’s top sporting competitors. It’s


something we all need so that we can get through our days both at home and at work and be satisfied that we did our best and achieved something. It makes all the difference, not only to how we approach life’s many challenges but also to our wellbeing, to how we feel about ourselves whenever we ‘win’ or ‘fail’ at something. In a retailing environment the ‘win’ may be a high ticket sale you made


with a customer who wasn’t even thinking of buying anything but just wanted a bit of advice; it may be a customer who rang up to complain and you turned them around, left them feeling delighted that you quickly solved their issue. Or it may be that you negotiated a great deal with your supplier that suited both of you and which launched a new growing relationship. The ‘fail’ would be the opposite: the customer who didn’t buy from you,


the complainant who decided to take things further, the supplier rep who left empty-handed without an order. While it’s easy to accept that ‘these things happen’ and move on, the harder, more noble action is to do something about it, particularly if these ‘fails’ are occurring frequently and the business is stagnant.


A positive mindset In our training we highlight the differences between a positive growth mindset and a more negative fixed mindset. The first of these is one which accepts challenges, embraces change and is dedicated to growing your skillset in order to be adaptable and more successful. A growth mindset accepts that your skills can be improved and will take onboard ideas and suggestions that provide a positive framework and direction for making those improvements. People with a growth mindset understand that whilst there are certain


things beyond their control – COVID, Brexit, parking in the town centre, the weather – there are things that they can control: their attitude and approach to customers for example, the presentation of the shop floor, the experience and service they offer, and these are things they can do something about if they really want to evolve the business.


Don’t be complacent People with a fixed mindset, however, find the idea of change difficult. Whilst they may recognise that things are not perfect they rarely accept responsibility for their contribution to a catalogue of errors. They often believe that they don’t need to improve, that they are right and everyone else is wrong, and that nothing is their fault – it’s the fault of their customers, their suppliers, their competitors, the Internet. Worse still, people with a fixed mindset are often complacent, and complacency is a killer of business. If our trainers are in a room full of people with fixed mindsets then we


know we’re in for a challenge. The training will seem harder because it’ll take longer for them not just to understand why they need to change and how they can do it, but for them to accept our help in the first place. And it’ll take longer for the training to have a positive effect on the business. But it can happen. It does happen. The first step is to accept that anyone


can change, that all of us can be better at what we do, and no matter the enormity of everything stacked against you, you can improve your sales and be better than your competitors. No matter how old your business is, how small or large, or how ‘difficult’ your customers can be, with the right mindset you can compete at the highest level and give yourself every chance of winning those medals. First, you need to embrace a growth mindset, and there’s only person who can do that for you.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44