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FINE FOOD & WINE


“More passengers are looking for a premium dining experience, but that doesn’t always mean they want a sit- down meal as a result. Some want fine dining with shorter dwell times or premium meals to eat on the move.”


Nick Inkster, CEO Nordics & Spain and Group Director Strategic Client Relationships, SSP Group


represent a point of difference, often offering wider choice and greater value in the wines available ‘as the nature of cruising means F&B is a core part of the experience’.


Dwell time issues One example of destination-based dining is at Budapest Ferenc Liszt International Airport, which has experienced a significant uplift in its F&B turnover in the past three years. In


2018, it reached €190m


($215m) in total commercial sales as passenger numbers grew by 13.5% to 14.9m. Destination-seekers keen to


indulge in Hungarian fare at its flagship SkyCourt T2 area, combined with fewer meals being offered onboard and low-cost carriers accounting for a 56% share of traffic are all contributing factors to financial success. But this can present an opportunity as well as a headache for the airport. “With the vast majority of our


A Dufry-operated Saveurs de Provence outlet at Nice Côte d’Azur Airport.


F&B offering being on the mezzanine level, with no line of sight to retail, it


creates an issue in terms of [retail] penetration,” comments Dr. Patrick Bohl, Head of Retail and Advertising, Budapest Airport. “If we have other service level


issues, there is a direct impact on penetration and conversion rates, so getting the right mix of seating and increasing the speed of service means the food area becomes a real focus for us. Asked more generally if F&B is


having a negative impact on airports’ retail dwell time, Bohl responded: “The concept of share of wallet is something that has been widely discussed; if you have €10 to spend, it’s a choice. “At airports, it’s more a case of


allocating your dwell time. We are discussing potential elements of reducing commercial dwell time such as time spent in the queues for VAT refunds, passenger screening, or passport control. All of these are enemies of good penetration. “Whether F&B is eating up dwell


time at other airports really depends on the local situation.” «


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