search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Careers in restaurants


If you’re looking for a fast track to management or the chance to run a business – or you simply want to work with food and people in a high-octane environment – look no further than restaurants. There is a role for everyone in the UK’s booming


restaurant sector. As a nation we’re eating out more than ever, which means there are opportunities galore for those keen to work in an energetic environment. There are 70,000 restaurants in the UK and you can soon rise up the ranks – in fact, many managers are still in their twenties. From the cool casual dining operators, such as


Pho, Byron and Ego Restaurants, to established high-street favourites like PizzaExpress and Franco Manca, and fine dining restaurants such as Jason


International opportunities


In hospitality, you’ll never be short of work, wherever you are in the world. Whether you’re a sun worshipper or a skiing junkie, with your transferable skills you’ll find there will always be an opportunity for you. While your former schoolmates are beavering away in their nine-to-five jobs, you could be meeting and greeting high-fliers, managing multimillion-pound operations and working your way all around the world. Besides the favourite destinations of Australia,


Dubai and Europe, hospitality skills are in demand in some of the furthest-flung corners of the globe – China, Russia and the former Soviet republics to name a few. And there is always those most glamorous of tourism and business traveller hotspots, the Caribbean and the Far East. It’s worth noting, though, that while the opportunities


are growing, the competition for jobs is sharpening, so don’t expect to land a plum job on an idyllic island without getting some experience first. But take heart, English speakers tend to be in demand. So take your pick from sun, sand, sea, snow or the city.


12


Atherton’s Pollen Street Social in London, Tom Kerridge’s Hand & Flowers in Buckinghamshire or Raymond Blanc’s Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, you’re guaranteed to find the kind of environment that suits your personality. Although initially your pay may seem lower than in other industries, it’s possible to rise through the ranks faster and further. You’ll also be working with a team of young, fun-loving people who will become your second family. And you may even get to hone your skills with some of the most inspirational people around. If you are ambitious, the good news is that there


are many routes into restaurant management, and a hospitality degree is only one of them. Many


talented professionals have entered the industry as part-time workers, realised they enjoyed it and then worked their way up the career ladder. Others are happy to remain working the floor, getting a buzz out of making customers happy. If operational management interests you, you


could take advantage of the career structure in a large chain, such as Casual Dining Group, which operates Café Rouge and Las Iguanas. If fine wines are your passion, look at training as a sommelier at a Michelin-starred establishment. Your skills are never wasted. You can move from a Michelin- starred restaurant to a relaxed gastropub, or from a small bistro to a busy brasserie. Just make sure your experience counts.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92