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MAKING THE MOST OUT OF LIFE AT HOME


wellbeing. Talking of gyms, a private exercise space is becoming more of a consideration in home design. But lockdown has placed greater emphasis on specifi c features within those gyms. Virtual training sessions have soared during this time, which means a good screen with a good sound system is now as important as dumbells or an exercise mat. Kitchens, once places to prepare and eat food, will emerge as the heart of the home more than ever as we make the most of our living


and dining spaces: thus,


the emergence of larger kitchen islands and integrated seating;


all


ideal areas for eating, entertaining, doing homework or making zoom calls. Expect to see more sofas and armchairs in there too. And there are other considerations.


While medical advances are ever- improving living environments are contributing the an increase in life expectancy, the population will comprise many more


people of


retirement age whose needs will have to be catered for. The home of the future, was once a fanciful speculation, may well be here sooner than we think.


Throughout many European countries, those whose cities are renowned for their architecturally ornate apartments, millions had to develop ways of coping with being confi ned. In Spain, stories emerged of people using rooftop terraces for exercise. In Italy, residents brought cheer to the early stages of their lockdown by singing and playing musical instruments from their balconies. Many later took to doing online yoga while others painted or cooked, joining the likes of the leading chef Massimo Bottura online. In Germany, 42,000 software designers gathered online for a hackathon they aimed at fi nding solutions to problems such as improving inter-hospital communication, distributing food to the homeless, and helping farmers bring in the harvest. Unlike Londoners who took to the streets to applaud health


workers on selected dates, in Brussels, they went a step further from their windows and balconies at 8pm every evening. Belgium’s King Philippe fl ies a white fl ag from the Royal Palace in tribute. In France, where people faced fi nes


heavy for leaving home


without a valid excuse, such as walking the dog, humour became a social media staple with comedians posting daily. But the funniest contributions were from the public. Those such as Photoshopped images showing exhausted dogs with captions like: “Everyone in the apartment block has walked me today; when will it end?”


FOR MORE INFORMATION ec.europa.eu


DOMOTEX MAGAZINE 2021


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