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DOMOTEX COVID 62


INTERIOR The most disruptive year anyone can remember has changed the


way we live and the way we think about our homes. But how is the interiors industry responding and what will 2021 have in store?


Photography | Shutterstock and Tom Blachford Words | World Show Media staff


A year of living in and out of lockdowns has changed the way we see our homes and is set to infl uence the way architects, interior designers and the construction industry approach their jobs. For more than a year, disruption has defi ned our lives and, as the dust settles on a post- pandemic world, it’s likely they will defi ne our future, something that has not been lost on the interiors industry. The British designer Katharine Pooley stressed the importance of cleanliness and health and predicts that materials will be modifi ed to ensure they are capable of being deep-cleaned, predicting that those with anti-bacterial properties such as copper, linen and certain timbers may become more popular: as will durable polished plasters, limestone and marble. “International clients already request delineated areas/ lobbies to entrance halls for ‘outside clothes and shoes’ to be removed and stored,” she told Homes and Gardens magazine. “This has been


common in Asia for many years but may well become a new European norm.” The


Japanese bathroom


QUO TE


BACK TO CONTENTS DOMOTEX MAGAZINE 2021


manufacturer TOTO has reported increased demand in Europe during the pandemic for its contemporary toilets and WASHLET shower loos - the sort of smart sanitaryware used in hospitals for its self-cleaning ability and hygienic technology, which can prevent germs spreading. Cédric Van Styvendael, President of Housing Europe, the Federation for Public, Co-operative and Social Housing said: “Most people have had to spend signifi cantly more time at home, with around four out of ten workers taking up remote working for the fi rst time. For those with children, our homes have also become de facto schools and playgrounds. This has brought into sharp focus the question of the


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