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MORE THAN A DESIGNER FLOOR CHOICE. JOINERS COVET IT AS URE STAPLE, ARCHITECTS FOR ELABORATE MOULDING AND THE WORLD FOR THE SORT OF RESILIENCE THAT PUTS THE POWER S AND BASEBALL BATS. IT’S ALSO VERSATILE, GIVEN A COLOUR CAN SEE IT IN WHITE TO OR DARK BROWN. WHAT MAY NOT BE T IS THAT IT’S CAPABLE OF CRUISING AT 55MPH, HAVING BEEN GLY ENGINEERED TO CREATE, NOT A CABINET OR FRONT DOOR, NG ROADSTER. THE CAR IS THE BRAINCHILD OF PETER SZABÓ, “WOOD ARTISAN” WHO SPENT THREE YEARS AND €18,000 ON THE PROJECT.


IRST CAR TO HAVE ITS ORIGINS IN TREES, BUT IT IS ARGUABLY ONAL. FOR A START, HE NAMED IT JULIA, AFTER HIS WIFE. THE ATHER, THE CHASSIS IS MADE OF STEEL. IT HAS A 2.3 LITRE V6 ENGINE AND AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION.


UDES TABLET-CONTROLLED HEADLIGHTS AND MUSIC. THE REST ULPTED IN ASH, INCLUDING THE STEERING WHEEL. IT IS 1.90M LL, DUE TO THE HIGH GROUND CLEARANCE (25CM), AND HAS A SE. AS FOR MR SZABÓ, HIS INSPIRATION BEGAN IN 2008 WHEN ND CREATED A WOODEN CARRIAGE. THEN HE “CONCEIVED” THE NG IT. HIS FRIEND, FERENCZI CSABA ZSOLT, AN ENGINEER AND ER, TOOK PICTURES OF THE CAR AND CREATED 3D DRAWINGS.


ISTED THE HELP OF AN ENGINEER WHO HELPED TO MATCH THE M AN OLD FORD TAUNUS – WITH HIS CREATION. SZABÓ ADMITS ASY TO MAKE BOTH SIDES OF THE CAR EQUAL, SOMETHING FOR SED A BI-DIMENSIONAL TELEMETER. THE PIECES OF ASH WERE GLUED TOGETHER WITH KLEIBERI POLYURETHANE D4.


mes. Now, it seems, they are being put to more interesting uses, even forming


you think of the breadth of innovation involving one of our most prized natural clear though are the endless possibilities


Photography | global.toyota Words | Richard Burton


STRONG FLOORING STAPLE IN ASIA HAS MADE ITS WAY ON TO A ROADWORTHY WHEELBASE, THANKS TO A MORE TRADITIONAL VISIONARY IN THE FORM OF TOYOTA WHICH CREATED AN IMPRESSIVE OPEN-TOP TWO SEATER


1.60m tall, due to the high ground clearance (25cm), and has a 3.12m wheelbase. As for Mr Szabó, his inspiration began in 2008 when he designed and created a wooden carriage. Then he “conceived” the car by sculpting it. His friend, Ferenczi Csaba Zsolt, an engineer and photographer, took pictures of the car and created 3D drawings. Szabó enlisted the help of an engineer who helped to match the engine – from an old Ford Taunus –


roadworthy wheelbase, thanks to a more traditional visionary in the form of Toyota which created an impressive open-top two-seater made out of Japanese Cedar. Launched in Milan in 2016, the most commonly used timber in Japanese building projects was used as a way of changing the perception that “modern cars have to be high- tech machines packed with the latest technologies”. The other concept behind the car, known as the Setsuna, was to highlight the aff ection owners develop for family vehicles, in contrast to the more disposable nature of the digital devices that are easily


OF JAPANESE CEDAR. LAUNCHED IN MILAN IN 2016, THE MOST SED TIMBER IN JAPANESE BUILDING PROJECTS WAS USED AS A ING THE PERCEPTION THAT “MODERN CARS HAVE TO BE HIGH-


DOMOTEX MAGAZINE 2021 BACK TO CONTENTS


with his creation. Szabó admits it was not easy to make both sides of the car equal, something for which he used a bi-dimensional telemeter. The pieces of ash were glued together with Kleiberi Polyurethane D4. Another strong fl ooring staple in Asia has made its way on to a


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