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DOMOTEX TIMBER 54


BOX CLEVER The age of wood – how progressive architects built a house


entirely of timber and managed to blend it within with a German pine forest. That’s what we call thinking outside the box


Photography | Cesar Bejar | Dezeen.com Words |World Show Media staff


Natural wood has been moving off the fl oor and embracing whole buildings with startling eff ects as timber becomes a material of choice for some of Europe’s most innovative architects. For evidence, you just have to look at the wooden modules the Stuttgart studio, Von M, used to complete a carbon-neutral hotel clad in white shingles in the centre of Ludwigsburg. Sited close to the city’s baroque castle and a seventies’ shopping centre, it formed part of an ambitious plan to completely rejuvenate the entire area. Or the 18 Mountain and Cloud Cabins Mu Wei brought to life in the Norwegian mountainside as part of a build-as-nature project designed to “breathe freely in the forest”. Or even the Thunder Top cabin from Gartnerfuglen Arkitekter in Telemark, Norway, with its accessible stepped roof that doubles as a viewpoint and winter ski jump. The creators describe it as “a man-made peak”, intended to blend in with its setting over time as it becomes enveloped by dwarf birch and heather.


Then there’s the swimming pool design emanating from the joint venture between the Dutch and French studios VenhoevenCS and Ateliers 2/3/4b in Paris, planned to sit alongside the Stade de France as the only permanent venue built for the 2024 Olympics. Wood is a natural choice for the age


in many ways. As a renewable and widely available building material, it leaves a much lower environmental footprint than other materials and structures of comparable strength. Wood is the only building material


Sweeping lines of larch cladding create a stunning eff ect on these timber homes, aided by strikingly contrasting blinds. They were the brainchild of IFUB on the site of dilapidated 1950s house in Munich. The direction of diagonal lines creates a subtle diff erentiation. Behind the cladding lies a timber frame. Architects deliberately placed the houses transversely to the road to achieve “an exciting and unusual composition”. What does unite them is the name, Hausfuchs, or Fox House, after an original ornament attached to the front.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ifub.de


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DOMOTEX MAGAZINE 2021


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