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FOCUS | Trends for 2020


Solstice LED illuminated


bathroom mirror with matt black frame by HiB


BATHROOMS J


ust as in kitchens, ‘raw’ natural-looking materials, metallic finishes and pops of bright colour, or dark, moody tones are likely to dominate in bathrooms for 2020. Sustainability and eco-awareness are also factors increasingly driving consumer choices, although where water-saving products, such as showers, are concerned, there is still some way to go in convincing consumers that they can have an eco-friendly option without compromising experience.


Kohler senior channel manager Stephanie Matthews notes that while the issue of sustainability can be a difficult one to balance, as bathrooms are, on average, only updated every 11 years, consumers are looking to future-proof projects with sustainable choices. And, with technological advances gathering apace, it may not be long before these products start to become more mainstream.


the


Showering is estimated to be largest contributor


to


domestic water consumption. The average number of showers per day grew to 1.2 in 2018 and that figure is expected to grow to 1.3 by 2025. There are approximately 24 million showers currently installed in homes across England and Wales.


with water saving in mind.


Tile trends will become warmer and more inviting, with marbles, woods and patterned designs all working harmoniously together


So, as Aqualisa director of innovation, product, and marketing Paul Pickford points out, there is huge scope for improvement in this area and it is the responsibility of manufacturers to design products


44


Pickford says: “For new installations, digital shower technology has the capability to add smart adaptations to systems with water-saving benefits. At Aqualisa, environmental consciousness is a core factor for the company strategy and as part of this, we have designed products that help our customers save water. We’ve introduced an Eco Mode setting for all of our digital models that can save close to a third of average water use per shower. Our Q product has sensors that reduce the water flow if you step away to apply soap or shave, etc.” Across the bathroom industry, manufacturers are working hard to make their products more water- smart or sustainable. To give some more examples, Grohe’s wall- mounted Rainshower Cosmo- politan shower features a number


of spray settings,


including EcoJoy, which cuts water usage by as much as 40% “while delivering complete showering satisfaction”. Laufen’s Val brassware collection


has an Eco+


function, while Roca’s Malva range features innovative Cold


Start technology, which ensures water is only heated when it is required. Methven’s Satinjet technology, available in a number of its shower ranges, uses unique twin-jets to create the optimum water droplet size and pressure, producing over 300,000 droplets per


Marmi grey porcelain


split-face tiles. Available from Verona


second, but just nine litres of water per minute, while the S20 water-saving wall-hung WC from the Vitra Signature collection can be operated with a 2.5/4litre or 3/6litre flow. Manufacturers are also increasingly making sure the materials they use are the most innovative, functional and sustainable available. Bette’s glazed titanium steel and Kaldewei’s steel enamel that the brands use to create most of their products are 100% recyclable.


Tiles


Sometimes referred to as the ‘canvas’ of the bathroom, tiles seem a good place to start. Among trends picked out by Ripples senior designer Helen Jones are bold, contrasting colours, geometric, intricate patterns, metro tiles and large-format tiles.


kbbreview · January 2020


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