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PRODUCTS | Multigenerational living


Generation game


This month we focus on multigenerational design, offering tips and advice on creating practical and beautiful kitchens and bathrooms for everyone. Francesca Seden reports…


survey of 4,000 adults by Aviva Insurance, for its How We Live report, discovered that a third (34%) are living in a multi-generational household - equivalent to more than nine million UK homes.


M


The most common type of household in the multi-generational category is one where adult children are still living at home with parents, accounting for nearly two in five multi- generational homes. ‘Boomerang’ children - where grown-up offspring have returned to the family home after university - account for a further 11%, and the same number of adult children (11%) are living at home while they are in further education, the study found. However, there are also a considerable number of older relatives who live with their families, usually for health or financial reasons.


While in percentage terms, the proportion of older relatives living with family members is much lower (14% of all multi-generational households), this accounts for 1.28 million homes across the UK. A similar Aviva study from 2016 found that older relatives accounted for just 9% of multi- generational households, indicating a dramatic increase.


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There is some contention in the KBB industry as to what multigenerational design means. While some suggest it should be completely accessible for wheelchair users and those with limited mobility, others believe that although there should be some crossover, such accessible solutions aren’t always necessary. Obviously, what is needed will


depend entirely on the client, and this feature will take a broader look at multigenerational design and what that means, while also exploring some of the best accessible solutions currently available on the market. First, we’ll look at kitchens and then at bathrooms. So, what key things should retailers bear in mind when planning a multigenerational kitchen? What


features could designers plan-in to future-proof their designs? And, what products should retailers be considering to ensure their kitchen designs are as inclusive as possible? Where lay out is concerned, design should centre around both the present and any future changing needs of the inhabitants and their physical mobility. And the kitchen should be sociable,


· August 2021


ultigenerational living is definitely on the increase. A recent


Blum’s pull-out shelf lock secures the


surface, providing safe, extra worktops often needed in the kitchen, bedroom or living area


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