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58 Take a Walk Froward Point


From the Brixham to Kingswear Road (B3205) follow the signs to Coleton Fishacre Gardens and then the signs to Higher Brownstone. This walk has spectacular views across the Dart Estuary and Start Bay.


A CIRCULAR WALK


START: Higher Brownstone Car Park, near Kingswear - TQ6 0EQ DISTANCE: 1.9 miles (2.9 km) Easy/moderate


TERRAIN: The walk from the National Trust car park at Higher Brownstone to the Daymark is level and smooth. From there to Froward Point, the road is quite steep but smooth.


Route Description 1. Go through gate across the end of the car park and follow the track which will lead you to Froward Point. Midway, take the path running across the field to view the hollow stone tower of the Daymark, built in 1864 to help shipping find the entrance to the River Dart.


Much of the area around Froward Point is owned by the National Trust which works with its tenant farmers to manage the land for farmland birds and rare arable plants. Many of the fields are home to the Skylark -the liquid song of this crested bird can often be heard as it rises in its characteristic songflight. The Linnet, a sociable ground-feeding finch is also found here, as is the rare cirl bunting, with its yellow and black facial stripes and green-brown plumage. Among the rare arable flowers in these fields are the pink lipped flowers of the lesser snapdragon, the bright blue cornflower and the purple and yellow flowers of the sharp-leaved Fluellen. At Inner Froward Point is the Brownstone Battery complex built in 1942 as a defence against Ger- man naval attack. Its guns had a range of over 14 miles and operated in tandem with a power- ful searchlight situated close to the high water mark. During the war, the Battery was manned by up to 300 soldiers, and the cliffs all around were strung with barbed wire. It is well worth the


steep descent and climb back up again to explore the remains. A National Coastwatch Institute station is now situated here and has fine views across Start Bay. Visitors are welcome to pop into the lookout and to peruse the display in the building opposite. The Mew Stone, visible offshore, is home to a large seabird colony as well as being the most easterly ‘haul-out’ for grey seals in the English Channel.


2. Return to the car park following the same route.


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