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16


A stroll around town


THE BOAT FLOAT This is the square of water right in the middle of the town where small boats can moor. Parts of the enclosure date back to 1585.


NEWCOMEN ENGINE Designed by Dartmouth engineer Thomas Newcomen, this is the oldest preserved working steam engine in the world. Built around the mid 1700s, it was initially used for pumping water out of coal mines.


THE OLD MARKET This listed building was created


as a pannier market in 1828 with arches for horse drawn carriages to enter laden with goods. Today you can still buy delicious delicacies from local farms. There’s a selection of cafés, independent shops and a fishmongers.


THE EMBANKMENT Dartmouth embankment runs next to the water along the entire length of the town and is nearly a mile long. The majority was built in the 19th century. It’s a perfect place to find a bench and take five minutes to enjoy uninterrupted views of the river.


CORONATION PARK This is a large recreation ground used by dog walkers, Sunday afternoon cricketers and families who spread out picnics in the summer. There are tennis courts, a play park, a café and a boat park.


LOWER/HIGHER FERRY Two car ferries cross the Dart every day. The higher ferry, near the Dart Marina Hotel, uses a wire ropes system. The lower ferry near Bayards Cove is operated by a tug boat and has been transporting vehicles since the 1700s.


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