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Business News Growth Through People is launched By Jessica Brookes


Business leaders and experts in people management gathered to launch a major Greater Birmingham Chambers of Commerce productivity campaign. Growth Through People –


originally the brainchild of Chamber Council member Diane Rance - is a campaign of events, research, thought-leadership and social media content, aimed at promoting the positive impact leadership and people management skills have on productivity. The campaign launched with an event Birmingham’s Botanical Gardens and week one focused on Growth Through Responsible Leadership. The campaign comprises four


themed weeks – Growth Through Responsible Leadership week (sponsored by University of Birmingham), Growth Through Attracting & Developing Talent week (sponsored by Aston University), Growth Through Unlocking Potential week (sponsored by Curium Solutions) and Growth Through Workplace Resilience week (sponsored by the Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development). In week two, some of the region’s top employers tackle the issue of attracting and


Some of Growth Through People’s participants – Back row (from left): Paul Faulkner, Ian Reid (CEO, Birmingham 2022), Emily Stubbs (GBCC) and Diane Rance. Front row (from left): Anjum Khan (Asian Business Chamber of Commerce), Stuart Bailey (Curium Solutions), Kiran Trehan (University of Birmingham) and Zurina Panesar (Curium Solutions)


developing talent. Growth Through Unlocking


Potential week includes a masterclass in mentoring and coaching, an interactive learning session on what it means to be a diverse and inclusive leader, led by


Chamber lends support to business schemes


By John Lamb


West Midlands mayor Andy Street has welcomed support from Greater Birmingham Chambers of Commerce (GBCC) for two “important and worthwhile” business schemes. The Chamber has joined some of


the region's biggest employers to tackle the lack of diversity at the top of major companies and public bodies. It also backed the mayor’s Giving


Day on Friday 28 June, an initiative to link charities with some of the region’s biggest firms to help business give something back to their local communities. More than 60 businesses are


involved in the Inclusive Leadership Pledge – an initiative aimed at rebalancing boardrooms. The pledge is the result of a


hard-hitting report – Leaders Like You – published last summer by the independent West Midlands Leadership Commission, which focused on the experiences of black and ethnic minority communities, women, the LGBT


Andy Street: leadership pledge


Curium Solutions, and a keynote speech from leading criminologist Craig Pinkney. Week four highlights include Mondelez International’s UK managing director, Louise Stigant discussing Growth Through Workplace Resilience.


Paul Faulkner, chief executive of


GBCC, said: “We have a host of incredibly informative events and thought leadership content lined up, and I encourage any interested readers to register to attend campaign events.”


Firms are failing to be more diverse


Organisations are failing to exploit the full leadership potential within their teams, according to a study from Curium Solutions. The report – ‘Empowering inclusive leadership in a diverse world’ -


surveyed managers and supervisors in the telecommunications, retail and leisure and financial services sectors. Each of them experienced TetraMap, a learning model and


community, disabled people and lower social economic groups such as white, working class boys. Mr Street said: “I’m delighted


that the Chamber is throwing its support behind both the Inclusive Leadership Pledge and the Mayor’s Giving Day. We want 1,000 local businesses and organisations to sign up to the Pledge by the end of 2019 – and I’ve no doubt the Chamber’s support will be vital in achieving that goal.” Paul Faulkner, chief executive of


the GBCC, said: “We feel it is important that the Chamber joins these important initiatives and urge businesses to get involved. “Greater diversity at board level


is absolutely essential and is fully supported by the Chamber.”


personality assessment which assesses what kind of leaders people are, based on four elements - Earth, wind, water and fire. The report, produced with Diverse Minds, found leadership roles are


dominated by those who prioritise outcomes over people-focused attributes, such as collaboration and cohesion. It also showed that people with a high


Earth preference – who are task and outcome focused – are more likely to be in senior roles. More people- focused individuals – those with a high water preference - are less commonly found in leadership roles. Anne Clews, Curium Solutions’


head of performance solutions, said: “For us, this doesn’t go far enough. Our research shows that to be truly inclusive, leaders need to understand and empower diversity of personality, thinking and behaviour.”


Anne Clews: Culture change March 2019 CHAMBERLINK7


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