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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS LAKELAND PAVING DRIVEWAY & PATIO SPECIALISTS


•Driveways•Patios•Paths• •Walling•Fencing•Turfing•


Installation, Service and Repair Natural Gas and LPG Bathrooms Heating, Radiators and Underfloor General Plumbing Work


Telephone 07717 765 199 WALL&TREE


COCKERMOUTH • Tree surgery, maintenance and removals • Garden maintenance and make overs • Small landscaping projects undertaken • Fencing repairs and installation • Chainsaw work, firewood processing and splitting


Tel: 01900 828947 Mob: 07907 225 316 Email: moose.moore@live.co.uk


•Free Estimates•Free Advice Guaranteeing work to the highest standards


For a professional and reliable service please call


T.01900 828164 M.07706 931 505 email: lakelandpaving@hotmail.com


COCKERMOUTH ALLOTMENT & GARDEN ASSOCIATION


The cold March is slowly relaxing its grip and the plants in our gardens are responding, with green shoots appearing and early spring flowers.


Craig Muller


07990 543 324 / 01900 268 156 othpservices@gmail.com


Neil Ritson 07793 135012 • 01900 823368


CONSERVATORIES & WINDOWS


Your Local Craftsman at Competitive Prices with over 25 years experience!


CONSERVATORIES • WINDOWS DOORS • PORCH GUTTERING FASCIAS AND SOFFITS


FAILED UNIT DOUBLE GLAZING REPAIRS COCKERMOUTH FRIENDS OF


CANCER RESEARCH UK For donations or In Memoriam gifts please telephone: 017687 76582


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK ISSUE 425 | 26 APRIL 2018 | 58


The winter seems to have been a long one and the relatively late coming into leaf of trees and shrubs reflects this. Snowdrops, crocus and chindoxia have finished flowering. Daffodils, tulips garden hyacinths and snakes head fritillaries are now blooming, whist alliums and lilies are just beginning to show green. The flowering period of bulbs and corms is dependent on the weather and can make a dramatic impact in any garden. A number of open gardens specialise in bulb displays and the vast number of visitors to these is a testament to the effect these plants can have. The finest display in the world, is at the Keukenhof Gardens near Amsterdam in Holland, where they plant fresh bulbs throughout the year on a rolling programme to create an ever- changing scene.


Bulbs and corms are long-living and require little maintenance, other than


lifting every 4 to 5 years to split to keep the flower quality. They can be expensive initially but last for years and generally can be relied on to flower every year and not seed. They can be used under deciduous shrubs to provide early spring colour, in spaces in flower borders to fill in before or after other plants have bloomed, or in a bed on their own with different types of bulb planted at different depths to create an ever-changing scene. Snowdrops, crocus, aconites and chindoxia are early flowering; followed by dwarf daffodils, standard daffodils then tulips. Alliums and lilies follow on and thus this creates a bed with at least 6 months colour. This could be extended into the autumn, with autumn-flowering crocus and Nerine.


One issue with bulbs, is that they are invisible when they have finished flowering and so there is a risk that they may get dug up or damaged when carrying other tasks: gardeners need good memories of the planting scheme!


We are contactable at: cagassociation@btinternet.com


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