This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FITNESS IN SPORT


KIRSTYN MACRANDAL, SPEED COMMUNICATIONS


Isokinetic London offers facilities which would usually only be available at elite sports medicine or military rehabilitation centres


KINETIC ENERGY


Italian rehabilitation expert Isokinetic has opened its first international facility in central London. The new clinic was recently accredited as a FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence


D


uring 1987, Dr Stefano Della Villa and his colleague Dr Gianni Nanni launched Isokinetic Medical Group and opened the company’s


first orthopaedic rehabilitation centre in Bologna, Italy. Now, after spending 27 years developing the concept – which aims to shorten the time it takes to recover from serious injuries – they have opened the doors to Isokinetic’s first international centre on London’s famous Harley Street. The London site was recently accredited as the first FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence. Isokinetic aims to offer a new approach


to the way in which sports injuries are managed. At the core of its strategy is an inter-disciplinary approach to recovery. With a range of rehabilitation specialists – including sports medicine experts, physiotherapists and rehabilitation scientists – working together in a team setting, the Isokinetic ethos is to create a personalised service and to place the patient at the very heart of recovery. “We pride ourselves in tailoring our


rehabilitation programmes to the patient,” says Mike Davison, MD of Isokinetic London. “Each patient at Isokinetic is assigned a dedicated case manager who co- ordinates a team of experts and supports


74


the patient from day one of the recovery journey through to a return to the field. For us, every patient is treated equal, whether they are an international footballer or somebody who plays tennis to keep fit.” Central to Isokinetic’s philosophy is


Isokinetic is an expert in ACL injuries Specialised care


With more than 27 years’ experience in sport injury rehabilitation, Isokinetic Medical Group has dealt with a wide range of injuries, but has specialised in acute knee injuries. According to Mike Davison,


Isokinetic’s MD for UK operations, the group has treated more than 7,500 anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs). “As one of the body’s most complex


joints the knee is susceptible to injury, especially under the pressures placed on the joint during sport,” says Davison. “All too often we see ACL ruptures


as a result of sport, in particular among elite players.”


comradery; so often associated with sport but lost in sport rehabilitation. With open plan recovery spaces, patients are encouraged to train alongside each other, providing support and encouragement – whether elite stars or weekend players. “Recovery is a long process and there is no such thing as a quick fix,” says Davison. “The way Isokinetic operates is to build a rapport among patients. “The aim is to make sure no-one feels alone on the journey. Through experience, we’ve found that this approach leads to greater adherence to the rehabilitation processes. It’s not for everyone but it makes for a great atmosphere.”


AN ITALIAN HISTORY Dr Stefano Della Villa’s vision – for there to be a new high-tech approach to sports injury rehabilitation and for it to be at the forefront of scientific research – came to him after completing an internship in the US. Having worked alongside professor Michael Dillingham, director of Stanford University’s sports medicine programme,


sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92