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It is estimated that in the UK, around 100 full-size pitches need replacing each year


The change towards more environmentally friendly practices needs to be instigated by those who fund the refurbishments and installations of artificial pitches


eco-friendly lift and de-fill services – such as Turf Muncher and TRS – while suppliers are increasingly looking at recycling. Fieldturf and TigerTurf are among


the companies which recycle materials into shock pads. Tiger Turf also recently launched a new multifunctional and environmentally-friendly synthetic turf system, which aims to reduce the waste accumulated by 3G pitches at the end of their natural lives. TenCate Ecocept is a porous base which uses a combination of recycled materials and prevents the need for waste materials to go to landfill – as well as significantly reducing the carbon footprint of new pitch installations. According to Paul Langford, managing


director at TigerTurf, the system offers “cradle to cradle recyclability”, with up to 90 per cent of the base layer made from otherwise landfilled products such as end of life waste plastics and a rubber crumb infill. “This has the potential to save as much as 140 tonnes from landfill for each full-size pitch installed,” Langford says. Another company which has taken


an innovative approach to tackling the problem is Xtraction. By carrying out work on site and reclaiming and re-using materials, the company aims to minimise damage to the environment and reduce consumption and cost by ethically removing playing surfaces. An example of Xtraction’s work is the Mayfield School


sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


in Redbridge, London. The school had to have its all-weather pitch removed and replaced just months after it had been laid because it did not meet the Football Association’s specifications. Xtraction was able to reclaim 156 tonnes of infill from the pitch, allowing it to be reused as infill material for the new 3G pitch – removing the need for an estimated 19 lorries to remove it and bring new material to site. The carpet itself was undamaged by the process and will be re-used in public access areas at Twickenham during the Rugby World Cup later this year – it will also be available for further relocation and reuse after that. Xtraction co-director Nick Wells


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