This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
NATURAL TURF


Edgbaston has a rich history and has staged a host of memorable games –such as the 2013 Champions Trophy final between India and England


The standard of playing surfaces in this country is outstanding when you consider our weather – it’s clear that groundsmen put their heart and soul into the job


ECB for Barwell to produce a certain type of pitch will, of course, be a closely guarded secret. “I work directly with all of the game’s key stakeholders – governing bodies, broadcasters and sponsors – to


ensure everyone benefits from their involvement at Edgbaston,” he says. “There will not be that much difference for the Ashes game; apart from an increased level of security checks and, of course,


EDGBASTON FACT FILE ESTABLISHED: 1886 CAPACITY: 25,000 FIRST TEST: 1902


Edgbaston’s first Test Match was the opening game of the Ashes series in 1902, for which the club erected a permanent stand, two temporary stands and facilities for 90 members of the press. Since then, 47 Tests have been held at the venue. The record attendance at a County Championship match at Edgbaston is 28,000 against Lancashire in the


68 Edgbaston Cricket Ground in 1895


championship- winning season of 1951, and the record for a single day of a Test Match is 32,000 against the West Indies in 1957. Of all England’s Test grounds Edgbaston is the least disrupted by rain – losing an average of fewer than


90 minutes of play per match between 1979 and 1988, compared to more than eight hours per match at other grounds.


heightened media scrutiny of every ball and, naturally, of the pitch itself.” Barwell has been at Edgbaston since


2011, after a two-year spell as assistant head groundsman at Trent Bridge, the home to Nottinghamshire CCC. At Trent Bridge, he primarily looked after the World 20/20 nursery ground. Before Nottingham, he had established himself as part of the team at Leicestershire CCC, where he completed his work experience while studying for NVQ Levels 1, 2 and 3 in greenkeeping and turf management. He credits his recent IOG award to


his hard-working team – and to the very particular type of passion that any successful groundsman “must possess”. “My guys do a great job, often working


very long and unsociable hours around – or because of – the weather,” Barwell says. “I do ask a lot of them and I appreciate their support. Every groundsman faces the same challenge: a battle to get the pitch right. But the standard of playing surfaces in this country is outstanding when you consider our weather. It is clear that groundsmen put their heart and soul into the job.” l


sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92