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NEWS UPDATE


US Olympic Museum designs unveiled


Inspired by the movement of ath- letes, New York-based Diller Scofi dio + Renfro has revealed its preliminary designs for the United States Olympic Museum. Located in Colorado Springs, The 60,000sq ft (5,574sq m) museum is dedicated to the achievements of US Olympic and Paralympic athletes, and is expected to open before the 2018 Winter Olympics, being held in PyeongChang, South Korea. Groundbreaking has been sched- uled for 2016 and the 20,000sq ft (1,858sq m) attraction will explore the training regimens of Team USA athletes, record-breaking perfor- mances and sports technology. Read more: http://lei.sr?a=p9B9z


The StreetGames’ Us Girls campaign will look to target females aged between 13 and 19 StreetGames to take Us Girls campaign to Wales


As well as big spenders, the over 65s were found to be loyal customers


Over 65s represent £16bn untapped opportunity


Leisure and sport businesses could be missing out on up to £16bn in revenues by failing to cater for the needs of over 65-year-olds. That is the top-line fi nding of An


ageing population: the untapped potential for hospitality and leisure businesses – a new report published by Barclays Corporate Banking, which found businesses are failing to appreciate the ‘grey pound.’ Britain’s ageing demography means the importance of this market will continue to increase –Barclays predicts that leisure spending by over 65s will reach £57bn by 2025.


Read more: http://lei.sr?a=Z5k2t


UNESCO and Al-Hilal want to use sport to engage excluded youths in confl ict zones


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StreetGames is to lead a push to get women and girls in Wales more physically active. The sports charity has appointed Jess Morgan to pilot the Us Girls cam- paign in Wales, aimed at girls between the ages of 13 and 19 who live in Communities 1st areas in Wales. The campaign will include the devel- opment of a Wales-based Us Girls consortium of organisations committed to increasing female sports participa- tion, as well as recruiting disadvantaged young female volunteers to help deliver the programme. Figures show that there is a considerable gender gap in physical activity in Wales. Nearly one third of Welsh


males (63 per cent) participate in sport, while the fi gure for females is less than 50 per cent. There are also twice as many male members (22 per cent) of sports clubs than females (11 per cent). The problem is related to girls becoming


physically inactive at a young age – at the end of secondary school, only 44 per cent of Welsh girls take part in sport. Morgan said there was a “huge need” to


get girls across Wales more active. “It’s not just about increasing fi tness and improving health, but giving girls opportunities they wouldn’t have had and increasing their con- fi dence and self-esteem,” she said. Read more: http://lei.sr?a=M6T2x


UNESCO and Al-Hilal push for social inclusion


Saudi Arabian football club Al-Hilal and UNESCO have joined forces to promote social inclusion through sports in con- fl ict zones. UNESCO director general, Irina Bokova and Al-Hilal president, Mohammad Al-Hmaidani, met to sign a three-year deal to work together in partnership. As part of the agreement, Al-Hilal will put up US$1.5m (€1.4m, £1m) in funding to support projects providing high-quality physical education in schools and the social integration of young people, especially in confl ict zones. Read more: http://lei.sr?a=P2n6n


sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


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