This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Gloucester’s Kingsholm stadium, which is famous for its noisy atmosphere, will host four World Cup games


Kingsholm Stadium, Gloucester


Capacity: 16,500 Opened: 1891 Home stadium of: Gloucester Rugby Matches at 2015 World Cup: 4 Background: After hosting its first Test match in 1900 (Wales beating England 13-3), Kingsholm had to wait 91 years and for the 1991 World Cup for its next international game, when 12,000 spectators witnessed an all-conquering New Zealand demolish USA 46- 6. The stadium is home to Aviva Premiership side Gloucester – widely regarded as having the noisiest crowd in the country, due to the boisterous inhabitants of The Shed stand.


Millennium Stadium, Cardiff


Capacity: 74,154 Opened: 1999 Home stadium of: Welsh rugby and football national teams Matches at 2015 World Cup: 8 Background: For a relatively new stadium, the Welsh national stadium has


already sealed a place in rugby history – Wales secured Six Nations Grand Slam victories here in 2005 and 2012. Situated a stone’s throw from Cardiff Central Station, it is the second largest sports venue in the world with a fully retractable roof and hosted games during the Rugby World Cup 1999 – including the Australia - France final.


Kingsholm will be one of the oldest venues used during the tournament


The Millennium Stadium has a rich rugby heritage – despite its young age


sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


45


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92