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TEMPORARY STRUCTURES


TOM WALKER, MANAGING EDITOR, SPORTS MANAGEMENT


INTERIM DESIGNS


Non-permanent facilities are increasing in popularity and are now being used in a number of ways across the world of sport. We look at some examples


To cope with Russia’s extreme weather, the indoor hall has been designed with heavy snow-bearing capability


L 70


okomotiv Moscow has invested in a new indoor football pitch to cater for both its junior set up and its first team professionals. Lokomotiv chose


Veldeman to design a tailor-made indoor hall. Veldeman worked in collaboration with its Russian distributorMagnum Sports to deliver the structure. Due to the extreme weather during


winter months, the 60x100m hall has snow- bearing capability of 180kg per sq metre. Up to a height of 3m, the side walls consist


Project: Indoor football pitch Client: Lokomotiv Moscow By: Veldeman


of steel plate and over the height of 3m, a double PVC canvas creates an insulating effect. The design – combined with modern heating and air conditioning systems – means the temperature can be maintained


at a pleasant level and the hall can be used for play throughout the year. The arena took six weeks to build at a cost of around RUB200m (£2.6m, €3.5m, US$4m). Olga Smorodskaya, president of FC


Lokomotiv, said: “The very name of the club, ‘Lokomotiv’, implies the will to lead, to be the first. “We’ve been Russian champions several times, and won several Russian cups. Now we’re pioneering again: this structure is the first of its kind in Russia.”


sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


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