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NEWS UPDATE


Airbnb to provide Rio Olympic accommodation


Online private rental portal Airbnb has struck a deal with Rio 2016 organisers which will see residents of the city provide up to 20,000 additional accommodation options for foreign Olympic guests. Airbnb will help provide “hotel” nights for the expected 380,000 foreign fans arriving for the Games next year, signifi cantly alleviating the city’s accommodation shortfall. Rio 2016 organisers have admitted that while a construction programme of new hotels in the city has increased capacity enough to host the 40,000-strong “Olympic family”, it had concerns that sports fans would struggle to fi nd places to stay. Read more: http://lei.sr?a=u4p8u


The Allianz Stadium – designed by architects Philip Cox, Richardson and Taylor – fi rst opened in 1988 Sydney to invest AU$1.2bn in two new stadiums


Plans to redevelop two existing stadiums in Sydney, Australia could be scrapped and replaced by a scheme to build two new major venues – at double the cost. The New South Wales (NSW) state


The stadium revamp has been designed by Alexander Sedgley


Ebbsfl eet stadium revamp gets approval


Gravesham Borough Council (GBC) in Kent has approved plans for the redevelopment of Ebbsfl eet United Football Club’s Stonebridge sta- dium in Northfl eet.


The planned £8m project – designed by architects Alexander Sedgley – will see capacity being increased from 4,000 to 6,000 spectators. The works have been designed to “match the clubs future ambitions” with a community-ori- entated vision. GBC approved a detailed planning application for a phased demolition of the stadium’s existing stands, ancillary buildings and structures.


Read more: http://lei.sr?a=q7H9e


The project aims to open up access to London’s largest public space – the River Thames


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government had previously earmarked AU$600m from the sale of the state’s electricity assets in order to upgrade the city’s two major sporting venues – the ANZ Stadium and Allianz Stadium. But rather than redeveloping the two existing stadiums, the alternative propos- als would replace the Allianz Stadium with a new, international-standard venue and also create a new, separate home for the


city’s rugby and football teams. According to The Daily Telegraph, NSW sport min- ister Stuart Ayres is expected to receive a report this year recommending a com- plete change in long-term strategy for sports in Sydney. It would see the Allianz Stadium demolished and replaced with an AU$100m multi-sport venue and a new AU$800m, 65,000-capacity stadium being built in adjacent Moore Park. The plans also include the construc- tion of a new 35,000-seat Parramatta Stadium, to act as the home to rugby league’s Parramatta Eels.


Read more: http://lei.sr?a=V6Z4w


Thames baths project reaches crowdfunding target


Architectural practice Studio Octopi’s dream of sparking a “swimming revolu- tion” – by creating a fl oating freshwater pool in London’s River Thames – is a step closer after the project reached its target of securing £125,000 through Kickstarter. The Thames Baths project – which has won backing from fi gures including art- ist Tracey Emin and London mayor Boris Johnson – has now been registered as a Community Interest Company, meaning it will be run as a social enterprise. Read more: http://lei.sr?a=2t5h3


sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


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