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The SRA’s to-do list calls for each local authority to produce a strategy for sport


New government - new challenges (and a few old ones) Emma Boggis, CEO, Sports and Recreation Alliance (SRA)


I


n the run up to the election we at the Sport and Recreation Alliance highlighted the benefits the sector has to offer the


physical, social and economic health of the nation. Our Minister’s To-Do List – a five-step plan for a more active population – offers a concise, easily understandable programme for government and the sector which, if implemented fully, would remove many of the obstacles to the sport and recreation sector realising its full potential. Putting the list together is


the straightforward part – the most challenging is putting it into action. With a collection of asks ranging from issues on school sport and tax through to elite funding, there needs to be


collaboration and a collective will to get to where we want. The SRA is firmly committed to making the collaboration happen. By taking the pulse of the sector and tapping into the knowledge of our members, we can inform ministers on key issues and facilitate discussions. The sport and recreation


sector can be a powerful tool


for change. From delivering economic growth to securing the future of the health system, our members and the activities they represent can help the new government make real progress. Our To-Do List will tell them how. The five key proposals are: 1. Support sport and


recreation through a fair and


Taking control of workforce development Tara Dillon, CEO, CIMSPA (The Chartered Institute of Sport & Physical Activity)


F


or years, employers have talked about taking greater responsibility for learning and


development in the sports and physical activity sector. Well, for the first time in my 28-year career, it’s happening. Employers have called for a unified outlook on skills and for one body to be responsible for workforce development in the sector. CIMSPA has responded to this call to action. We’ve committed to the


development of a single skills structure, led by employers, and have pledged to embed


education; a minimum standard for assessment and delivery protocols across all qualifications within the sector. We’re now working with


these three guiding principles: The custodianship of


standards and the framework for skills to sit within one body; a continuum of training provision across further education and higher


sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


ukactive and SkillsActive, our fellow organisations responsible for the industry’s training and development, to set a timeframe for delivering this change in workforce development. It’s a massive piece of work and marks a truly significant transition for our sector. Finally, employers will own and manage the training and development of their workforce. They will be responsible for establishing


the skills and competencies required by all staff, from entry level to senior management, to ensure they are appropriately skilled to meet the needs of the sector and to combat the inactivity epidemic. A similar process is


currently underway with the Trailblazer project, where a coalition of leisure employers is developing standards for leisure management and personal training apprenticeships. Trailblazer has whet employers’ appetites to dramatically improve the physical activity sector’s workforce development.


15


sustainable CASC system. 2. Increased investment


in Initial Teacher Training to ensure high quality PE. 3. Every local authority to


produce a strategy for sport. 4. Major events legislation to


ensure the UK remains home of world-class sport. 5. Appoint a dedicated minister for the outdoors.


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