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NEWS UPDATE


“Glittering jewel” of culture to be created at London’s Olympic Park


LDA Design has been selected to mas- terplan a university campus at London’s Olympic Park, featuring a museum, collec- tions libraries and performance spaces. A team led by the practice, which also includes Nicholas Hare Architects, will develop the 125,000sq m (1,345,489sq ft) campus for University College London (UCL), called UCL East. It will be located south of the ArcelorMittal Orbit and the Zaha Hadid-designed London Aquatics Centre at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, home of the 2012 Olympic Games. The UCL campus is part of the wider Olympicopolis development, which will also include projects involving the Victoria & Albert Museum, the University of the Arts and Sadler’s Wells. Talks are also ongoing with the US-based Smithsonian.


The University College London campus will form part of the wider Olympicopolis development


The 50,000sq m development will fea- ture the UCL Museum of the Future, where immersive exhibition galleries will be created. A school of design, a centre for experimental engineering, collections


Four operators shortlisted for new Perth stadium


Four companies have made it on to a short list of potential operators for a new AU$1bn (€706m, US$795m, £508m) stadium in Perth, Australia.


The four candidates are AEG Ogden, Nationwide Venue Management, Perth Stadium Management and Stadium Australia Operations – and one will be selected to manage the 60,000-capacity Perth Stadium, which will form the centrepiece of a new sporting precinct at Perth’s Burswood district.


AEG Ogden is a joint venture between Australia-based conpanies and AEG Facilities, a stand-alone affiliate of the Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG). AEG Ogden currently operates a large network of arenas, stadiums, exhibition centres and theatres through Australia, Asia and the Middle East. Nationwide Venue Management is part of the Melbourne-based Spotless group and focuses on venue management within the leisure, sports and entertainment industry. Perth Stadium Management is a


consortium incorporating the West Australian Football Commission, US-based catering and management company Delaware North, concert promoter Live Nation and Ticketmaster.


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libraries, and studio and performance spaces will also feature. A detailed masterplan for the site will now be developed over the coming months. Read more: http://lei.sr?a=j3A4U


Crouch is a qualified football coach The 60,000-seat stadium will have five tiers


Stadium Australia Operations currently operates the ANZ Stadium in Sydney – the venue of the 2000 Olympic Games. Due to open in time for the 2018 Australian Football League season, the Perth Stadium will host Australian rules football, rugby, soccer, cricket, and international acts and artists. Designed by a team consisting of Cox Architecture, design studio Hassell and architects HKS Sports and Entertainment Group, the stadium will be five-tiered with up-to 85 per cent of the seats being under cover. Brookfield Multiplex and John Laing won a contract to build the venue last year and construction started in December 2014.


Read more: http://lei.sr?a=H4v6z sportsmanagement.co.uk issue 2 2015 ©Cybertrek 2015


‘Sports mad’ Crouch named sports minister


Sport will have a true advocate in the newly-formed Conservative gov- ernment, following the appointment of Tracey Crouch as sports minister. Crouch, a self-confessed “sports nut” is the MP for Chatham and Aylesford in Kent and has been a member of the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee since 2012. She is a qualified football coach and continues to play actively, as well as coach a women’s football team – something she has done for 10 years. Crouch has actively pro- moted equal opportunities in sport and served as vice chair of the All Party Group for Women in Sport. Read more: http://lei.sr?a=V8z6j


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