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cv


equipment


THE BEST THINGS COME IN SMALL(ER) PACKAGES


Meet the all-new Concept2 Dynamic Indoor Rower, the latest incarnation of the world’s best selling indoor rower.


The Dynamic Rower:


Is 51cm smaller than a Model D or E


Requires a reduced footprint in your gym


Offers a more realistic rowing experience


Boasts all the benefits of its predecessors;


All body workout Suitable for all


Designed to last a lifetime Accurate & repeatable data


By understanding members’ aspirations, clubs can ensure they provide the correct environment


“Fitness participation and client


retention numbers show that the industry’s traditional offering is not meeting the needs of members,” says Alex Bennett, network manager for Technogym UK. “In the last decade, the profi les of fi tness members have dramatically diversifi ed. Clubs need to ensure that they offer an environment and range of services that meet both the conscious and sub-conscious needs of a variety of target groups. “Traditional fi tness training is too


often based on physical training goals of participants, often ignoring the underlying motives of clients. By understanding a member’s deeper aspirations, a club can ensure it interacts and provides the correct environment for members to work out in.” The recently launched Technogym


Club 2.0 concept is based on research from the IULM University of Milan, which identifi ed six core aspirations: move, shape, sport, power, balance and fun. It uses an individual’s ‘aspiration’ as the training goal and automatically creates a programme around this. Keiser, on the other hand, believes


power (power = strength x speed) to be the key to performance, and continues to develop its state of the art electronics to measure this force. Keiser’s aim is to make it simpler for the user to understand how hard they are working while exercising, and for tracking to be made easier for coaches. New CV equipment will be launched this year to complement the M3 indoor bike and M5 elliptical.


www.concept2.co.uk 0115 945 5522


44


HI-TECH: FITNESS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS Independent research by Leisure-net Solutions highlights that 51 per cent of members would spend more time on CV equipment if the machine provided entertainment and motivated them. According to the research, iPods are currently the most popular form of entertainment, but interactive capabilities within equipment have already hit the gym floor and the ‘of the moment’ trend is clearly that of integrated consoles, interactive technology, connectivity and user experience.


february 2011 © cybertrek 2011 Technogym considers its new


Visioweb to be the ultimate digital platform, with touch-screen displays that monitor user results and entertain during the workout. There’s not only access to TV, radio and iPod connection, but also to games and the internet. Clubs can also use Visioweb to communicate with members and guide them through a correct workout. Pulse Fitness, meanwhile, employs a


team of 10 specialist R&D professionals and recently launched the Fusion range of CV equipment. Continuing to focus on wireless, energy-effi cient technology, the new range embraces an advanced, integrated multimedia entertainment package that can display up to 50 Freeview channels and that has iPod compatibility. The new line also features an in-built education function that includes multiple motivational workouts. Thanks to a research and


development team specialising in CV products, Matrix’s 7 Series CV range features an integrated touch-screen TV console that’s iPod and Nike+ compatible. However, the newly launched Virtual Active programme takes interactive workouts one step further, enabling users to work out to cinema-quality footage of iconic destinations ranging from the Las Vegas Strip to Yosemite National Park. The experience is so realistic that the user


The Star Trac eSpinner, launched in 2008, provides a personalised, virtual workout


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