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JUSTIN MUSGROVE SPA DIRECTOR, THE BANNATYNE GROUP


clients who, in spite of the current economic climate, are not prepared to dilute their lifestyle choices. At Bannatyne Spas, we’ve chosen to work with aspirational product brands while delivering treatments at value for money prices. Clients are also attracted by product innovation, which


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we’re delivering through new offerings such as lava shells massages, supplied by Shared Beauty Secrets, and mineral make-up through ID Bare Minerals. We aim to attract both health club members and non-


members to our spas, and our relationships with gift voucher companies – such as Buy a Gift, lastminute.com and Spa Seekers – have maximised the exposure of our product range to the broader public. The web is also a key tool – it’s important to note the


growth in sales of spa treatments and vouchers through bannatyne.co.uk, which has become the most popular purchasing route compared to the other voucher outlets utilised by Bannatyne within the last 12 months.


011 will be about creating a balance between delivering value for money and meeting the standards demanded by


Operators must get the ambience of treatment rooms right, with appropriate décor, lighting, aromas, music


PICTURE: WWW.ISTOCKPHOTO.COM


NICK COUTTS INDUSTRY CONSULTANT T


he trend in this economy is for members to cut back on their spa visits – and spend – if they’re not


proactively encouraged to continue to use it. Health club spas will continue to be under pressure during the medium term as members make tough decisions around which of their ‘extra’ services they will cut back on in order to maintain their health club membership. As always, spas that focus on delivering excellent service that’s keenly priced will do better. As well as constantly delivering a quality service, spas


must proactively mine the club member database for new clients. Too many spas are tucked away in their clubs and the fact is that a signifi cant portion of club members are simply not aware of their existence. Spa managers who work closely with their two key colleagues


– the sales manager and the fi tness manager – will also do better. Ensuring that each new club joiner is toured via the spa, introduced to a therapist and offered a complimentary taster treatment will guarantee an increase in spa clients. Developing product bundling offers – treatments of relevance to gym-goers, such as deep-tissue or relaxing massages, physio sessions and so on – is also an excellent source of generating new spa clients.


DAVE COURTEEN MD, IMAGINE SPA MANAGEMENT


T


here’s an increasing demand for spa guests to be able to choose their treatment on the day rather than


when making the original booking. Guests also want fl exibility in the way they buy their spa packages and experiences. I think there’s a clear move to segment the purpose behind


the spa visit. There’s a real demand for ‘glamour’ treatments – to help prepare for a big night out or event, for example. A mineral make-up range is becoming increasingly popular within this segment and a high quality waxing offering is important too. A second segment comprises the ‘pamper’ treatments,


where guests just want to be spoilt for a while and have some well earned ‘me’ time. The demand here is for excellent therapists and a high quality product house range that the guest is unlikely to fi nd on the high street. There’s a real need for operators to get the ambience of the treatment room just right and use appropriate lighting, aromas and music to accompany the treatment. A third segment is ‘cosmeceutical’, with treatments


that provide an alternative to cosmetic surgery. Here the treatments are less focused on pampering and more on delivering effective results in the anti-ageing battle.


This feature fi rst appeared in the 2011 Health Club Management Handbook – www.healthclubhandbook.com february 2011 © cybertrek 2011 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 37


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