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Go-kart operations Part 1


Go-kart tracks have always been a popular part of many an amusement and theme park and today, of course, are also attractions in their own right at dedicated karting centres. In the first of a two part series, Simon Heap of the Fastline


There are 1


obviously many aspects to take into account when planning a go- kart track/facility. The following are six key areas to consider.


2 54 Type of market you are trying to attract.


This will have an impact on design and equipment selection. Are you after the family market, junior market (under 16), teenage market, corporate entertainment market or a more motorsports orientation? The selection will impact the choice of karts. For example, family orientation karts will probably be slower and have a lot of twin-seaters where dad and the kids can ride together, whereas motorsport orientation karts will be more powerful and may include a premium range which are faster again. Customers need to earn the right to drive these by doing their time in slower karts and showing they have the driving skills to progress to the premium karts.


This will also impact on track design. Junior tracks will be smaller and easier to negotiate; family tracks will be similar but wider to allow the twin karts room to manoeuvre. Finally, it will also impact the amenities you need to incorporate - corporate will require more catering and function rooms, while motorsports and juniors will require briefing rooms.


- Creating a winning formula


Group, which specialises in track design, installation, operation, equipment and the karts themselves, takes a look at some of the areas operators should consider when planning a go-kart track installation


Will it be a paid attraction or a free ride within a park with a one-time entry fee.


This can have a big impact on the popularity of the attraction. In theme parks which have an all inclusive ticket price, the go-kart attraction can generate significant interest and the operator needs to make some decisions about throughput levels. Do they want maximum throughput or will they tolerate larger queue lines and let the queue dictate the popularity. If they want maximum throughput then this impacts on kart and equipment levels, operational efficiencies and customer flow through the attraction. To maximise throughput you would restrict ride times to five minutes or less, have twice as many karts as the track can sustain (then a few spares), have a wider track to accommodate more karts and have a greater number of helmets. etc., so there are no delays in loading customers.


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