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quite a bit of attention in order to keep proper sanitation chemicals up to par. There are several systems available that automatically introduce chemicals into the water as needed which helps reduce the maintenance, but generally speaking, plan on spending more time on maintenance than with a pool.” Still, spraygrounds are proving they’re worth all that time and money. “Today’s economy has pressed communities to explore more economical


water recreation amenities,” says Rain Drop’s Kirsten Kahl. “Less costly than pools to build and operate and easier to maintain, spraygrounds still have a greater ‘wow’ factor. Communities have realised that this is a great way to provide a destination for families to have an outing on a local level, keeping within limited budgets. We’re seeing country clubs competing with health clubs who are competing with YMCAs. This fierce competition has them discovering that a sprayground is an amenity that becomes the differentiator. With lower operating costs, more and more can afford to add a sprayground to their facility.” It’s anyone’s guess what the next big thing in water play will be; much


easier to predict that Montreal’s Vortex, which invented the splash pad, will have something to do with it. Ulrike Elizabeth Rechler, the company’s director of business development in Europe, is confident the demand for all forms of water play structures will continue to grow. “Customers are becoming familiarised with the aquatic industry and


about what splash pads can offer. Countries with hot climates are investing in outdoor water play structures and the ones with colder climates are designing indoor amenities.” Ryan Vaughn at Rain Deck envisions affordable controllers with easily


programmable light/music shows. “Who wouldn’t want a mini Bellagio for a splash pad?”


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