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Keep Safety First During Fall Chores


Labor Day means summer’s over; schools are open; and it’s time to prepare your house and lawn for fall and winter. The first thing to prepare: power tools and electrical cords - including extension cords - in the home, garage, shed and yard.


Before you begin any outdoor project, check that your power tool is designed for outdoor use and that there are no damages to its wire. Never carry a power tool by the wire or use it near water. Check to see that the tool is in good working condition before use. If it’s not, don’t repair it yourself. Bring it to a licensed electrician or send it back to the manufacturer. And don’t overlook extension cords. Some tips for safety:





For outdoor jobs, use extension cords designed for outdoor use. They’re thicker, more durable and have connectors molded on them to prevent moisture damage.


Thank You!!


NO. OF OUTAGES 2


40 4 1 1 3 2 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1





• Do not buy a longer cord than you need. • Check the amperage rating of the extension cord to make sure it is high enough to meet the power demand of the tool you are using.


• •


Use three-wire extension cords with three-pronged plugs. Never cut the third prong off of a power tool to make it fit a cord.


Push plugs all the way into outlets to ensure complete connection.


• Do not plug one extension cord into another. Buy the proper length.


• Never leave an open extension cord that is plugged into an outlet. Unplug it when you’re finished using it.


Store extension cords in the garage so they won’t be exposed to snow and cold weather. 255002


Thank you for this awesome opportunity! We appreciate all that you have done to make this possible! Thank You,


Lexi McLane


Thank you so much for the opportunity to come to camp. I have learned a lot but also had fun while learning. I was proud to represent our co-op at this camp.


Sincerely,


MONTHLY OUTAGE REPORT CAUSE OF OUTAGE


Animal Lightning Storm


Broken Pigtail Member Error Wind


Blown Transformer Broken Poles Blown Fuse


Burnt Meter Base Trees


Planned Outage Unknown


Hot Line Clamp Someone Hit Harmon Electric Pole Burnt Fuse


Marshall Durrence


NO. OF METERS AFFECTED 2


426 577 1 1 3 2 3 2 1 1


110 245 1


259 1


For the month of July Harmon Electric experienced 66 separate outages. The total members affected were 1,635 with an average time off of 2.44 hours. The largest outages were again due to various lightning and thunder storms passing through the area.


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