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new business


Cooperative trustees are listed Bylaws are available online at up a copy at any CEC office.


CEC Trustee Elections DISTRICT I


Ken Autry, Snow, has lived in his community for 42 years. His diverse career includes working as a logging contractor, timber purchasing agent, and as an employee at a major battery company. For 10 years, he owned a computer networking and information technology business. Now retired, Autry is willing to devote his time to his community and his co-op. He believes his experiences qualify him as a good choice to represent members in District I. For two years, Autry served


on the CEC bylaw committee that proposed mail-in ballots. Te option gives all members the opportunity to vote, even if they are unable to attend the annual meeting. He also co-authored legislation that would make it easier for electric co-op members to obtain a quorum, which would reduce the cost of annual meetings and make it easier to conduct business. He also proposed a bylaw that would provide guidelines of executive sessions and video of open board meetings. If elected, Autry will represent the members of District I for the good of all coop members, keep the membership better informed, strive for better fiscal responsibility and complete the disclosure of all information legally and ethically allowed.


Jimmy Pound, Miller, graduated from Antlers High School in 1973 and entered the construction field. In 1976, he became a member of Choctaw Electric Cooperative in the Miller community where he grew up.


In 1982, Pound went to work as a fuel systems operator in a coal- fired generating plant. He remained there for 28 years until he retired in 2010.


Pound and his wife currently own and operate a cow/calf operation where they tend cattle, improve the land, bale hay, and generally enjoy the good country living in the Miller community.


Marcia Wright, Nashoba, (incumbent), and husband, Roger, are 35-year members of Choctaw Electric Cooperative. Tey have two daughters, Amanda (1975-2013) and Alaina, and four grandchildren. Wright’s faith in God, family and career, respectively, have given her a blessed life. She graduated from Southeastern Oklahoma State University in 1991 with a bachelor’s degree. She completed her master’s degree in 1995. Aſter a 29-year career in the education field, Wright retired as superintendent of Nashoba School in 2011. She has served on the Choctaw Electric Cooperative board of trustees since 2014. Trough dedication and determination, she completed the Credentialed Cooperative Director


(CCD) Program and became a member of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative board of trustees in 2015.


MAKE SURE YOUR


VOTE COUNTS! Attending the CEC Annual Meeting on Saturday, September 24, will help ensure the quorum necessary to conduct official co-op business. Without a quorum of at least five percent of CEC members present at the meeting, new business such as trustee elections and the vote on proposed bylaw amendments must be tabled. Please attend your meeting— and be counted!


CEC Annual Report • 11


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