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MAKE THE MOST OF CEILING FANS


BY TURNING ON THE FAN, YOU CAN TURN UP THE SAVINGS If you are like most Americans, you have at least one ceiling fan in


Tere is a children’s book titled Safety


1st, Safety Always. As you can imagine, it encompasses many of the traditional safety lessons parents should teach their children. We drill youngsters about safety from an early age because we know how important


it is to protect ourselves and those we care about. In the spirit of May being National Electrical Safety Month, let’s take a look at how electric cooperatives have been stepping up to the plate when it comes to safety at the co-op. Up until 2007, there was an alarming national trend among


electric co-ops, which was the fact that the number of “lost time” accidents was increasing. Lost time is defined as anything resulting in an employee missing time at work; these accidents could range from a sprained ankle to the ultimate tragedy of a fatality. Tis is why Federated Rural Electric Insurance Exchange, which


insures Harmon Electric and the vast majority of electric co-ops nationwide, initiated a campaign called a “Culture of Safety.” It was designed to create a much greater awareness about safety issues at all electric co-ops. Trough the use of strategy labs across the country, Federated


brought together CEOs and general managers, operations supervisors, safety directors and linemen to better understand how each group viewed safety. In doing so, differences in perceptions regarding safety within cooperatives were identified, allowing for much needed conversations and evaluations of how to raise awareness and improve local safety cultures. Te “Speak Up, Listen Up” program is designed to empower anyone who sees a potentially unsafe situation to Speak Up and encourages everyone to Listen Up to their concerns. Te results have been dramatic, with more than a 30 percent decline in the number of accidents over the past nine years. As a member, you too have a role. If you see any potential


dangerous situations or practices, you should report them as soon as possible to Harmon Electric Association. Te implementation and success of the Culture of Safety program


demonstrates a very important point. If we are intentional about our actions, we can indeed change the culture in our organizations. Te same is true for our families, our teams and any groups we may belong to.


We also know that living our cooperative principles and values


is equally important. We have the best business model because it puts you, the member-owner, at the center of our efforts. We look forward to being your safe electricity provider and


energy advisor long into the future. For more information about Harmon Electric’s Culture of Safety, visit www.harmonelectric.com.


HARMON ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC 114 North First Hollis, OK 73550


Operating in


Beckham, Harmon, Jackson, Kiowa and Greer Counties in Oklahoma and Hardeman and Childress Counties in Texas


Member of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives National Rural Electric Cooperative Association National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Oklahoma Rural Water Association, Inc.


HARMON ELECTRIC HI-LITES Lisa Richard, Editor


The Harmon Electric Hi-Lites is the publication of your local owned and operated rural electric cooperative, organized and incorporated under the laws of Oklahoma to serve you with low-cost electric power.


Charles Paxton ......................................................................................... Manager


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Pete Lassiter..................................................................................................District 1 Jim Reeves....................................................................................................District 2 Lee Sparkman...............................................................................................District 3 Braden Cunningham......................................................................................District 4 Burk Bullington ..............................................................................................District 5 Jean Pence....................................................................................................District 6 J. R. Conley...................................................................................................District 7 Charles Horton .............................................................................................. Attorney


Monthly Board of Directors meetings held fourth Thursday of each month


IF YOUR ELECTRICITY GOES OFF, REPORT THE OUTAGE


We have a 24-hour answering service to take outage reports and dispatch service- men. Any time you have an outage to report in the Hollis or Gould exchange area, call RXU RI¿FH DW


$Q\ RWKHU H[FKDQJH DUHD FDOO WROO IUHH


TO REPORT AN OUTAGE, CALL 688-3342 or 1-800-643-7769 ANYTIME


your home. Ceiling fans help our indoor life feel more comfortable. They are a decorative addition to our homes and, if used properly, can help lower energy costs.


7,36 )25 0$.,1* 7+( 0267 2) <285 &(,/,1* )$16


1. Flip the switch – Most ceiling fans have a switch near the blades. In warm months, flip the switch so that the blades operate in a counter clockwise direction, effectively producing a “wind chill” effect. Fans make the air near them feel cooler than it actually is. In winter, move the switch so the fan blades rotate clockwise, creating a gentle updraft. This pushes warm air down from the ceiling into occupied areas of the room. Regardless of the season, try operating the fan on its


lowest setting. 2. Adjust your thermostat – In the summer, when using a fan in conjunction with an air conditioner, or instead of it, you can turn your thermostat up three to five degrees without any reduction in comfort. This saves money since a fan is less costly to run than an air conditioner. In the winter, lower your thermostat’s set point by the same amount. Ceiling fans push the warm air from the ceiling back down toward the living space, which means the furnace won’t turn on


as frequently. 3. CHOOSE THE RIGHT SIZE – Make sure your ceiling fan is the right size for the room. A fan that is 36-44 inches in diameter will cool rooms up to 225 square feet. A fan that is 52 inches or more should be used to cool a larger


space. 4. TURN IT OFF – When the room is unoccupied, turn the fan off. Fans are intended to cool people - not rooms.


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