This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Tackling Outdoor Projects Safely


By Heath Martin NFEC Safety Director


Spring is here! A freshly mown


ODZQ FRORUIXO ÀRZHUV DQG D VWRQH path can give your yard some serious curb appeal. Before making improve- PHQWV WR \RXU \DUG E\ SODQWLQJ ÀRZ- ers, trimming bushes, or installing a new water feature, make sure you are doing so safely.


Before tackling any project, take a few minutes to prepare for the job, begin by making sure you’ve got the right tools for the job. Also check cords for any cracks or frayed insula- tion and proper connections. Then take note of potential hazards in the work area such as overhead power lines, especially those connected to the home.


Even professional contracted workers are not immune to electrical accidents, and it is important to keep VDIHW\ LQ PLQG 3UHSDULQJ IRU WKH MRE is an important part of tackling an outdoor project safely.


3D\ DWWHQWLRQ WR \RXU HOHFWULF WRROV and extension cords. Check the condi- tion of cords before each use. Look for fraying or cracking along the en- tire length of the cord and for damage to the plug or sockets. Replace any damaged extension cords or tools. Be sure to only use extension cords rated for outdoor use, and remember to unplug them when not in use. Extension cords are designed for temporary use only.


Remember electricity and water are a dangerous mix. If it is raining or the ground is wet, do not use electric power or yard tools. Never touch circuit breakers or fuses when you are wet or standing in water.


To help prevent electric shock, make sure outdoor outlets are equipped with ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs). If your out- door outlets do not have them, use a portable GFCI or have a professional install GFCI outlets.


Keep electric equipment at least 10 feet from wet areas, and always store power tools and extension cords in dry areas. Replace any that get damaged by water.


If you have overhead service, be especially careful when working near power lines attached to your house. Keep equipment and yourself at least 10 feet away from lines. Never trim trees near power lines — leave that to the professionals.


If you are planting a tree in your yard, consider the placement. Select a planting location that will not inter- fere with utility lines both in the air and underground. Tree branches can interfere with overhead power lines, and roots can do the same with under- ground utilities.


When taking on a project that requires any sort of digging, such as SODQWLQJ ÀRZHUV RU EXLOGLQJ IHQFH EH sure to call 811 before you dig. When you call, a professional will come to your home to mark underground public utilities so you know where it is safe to dig. Hitting an underground line can cause serious injury, disrupt service to you and your neighbors, and can be expensive to repair.


For more information on electrical


safety, visit SafeElectricity.org. or feel free to contact NFEC Safety Director, Heath Martin, at 580-928-3366.


Statement of Non-Discrimination


In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agri- culture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its agencies, RI¿FHV DQG HPSOR\HHV DQG LQVWLWXWLRQV participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminat- ing based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/pa- rental status, income derived from a pub- lic assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity, in any program or activity con- ducted or funded by USDA (not all bases apply to all programs.)


5HPHGLHV DQG FRPSODLQW ¿OLQJ GHDG- lines vary by program or incident.


3HUVRQ ZLWK GLVDELOLWLHV ZKR UHTXLUH alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape , American Sign Lan- guage, etc.) should contact the responsible Agency or USDA’s TARGET Center at (202)720-2600 (voice and TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800)877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made avail- able in languages other than English.


7R ¿OH D SURJUDP GLVFULPLQDWLRQ FRP-


SODLQW FRPSOHWH WKH 86'$ 3URJUDP 'LV- crimination Complaint Form, AD-3027, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/ FRPSODLQWB ¿OLQJBFXVW KWPO DQG DW DQ\ 86'$ RI¿FH RU ZULWH D OHWWHU DGGUHVVHG to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agri-


FXOWXUH 2I¿FH RI WKH $VVLVWDQW 6HFUHWDU\ for Civil Rights


:DVKLQJWRQ ' & ID[


gov


,QGHSHQGHQFH $YHQXH 6: RU


(3) email: program.intake@usda. USDA is an equal opportunity provid-


er, employer, and lender.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130