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DOING BUSINESS WITH... USA Part Two


Hunting is still very popular in the US and remains a vital part of American culture.


“Hunter spending is the lifeblood of countless small businesses in rural communities nationwide and hunters make up the main source of wildlife conservation funding through their purchases.” DOING BUSINESS WITH... | USA


how the relationship between the two works.


Hunters benefit the country


in many ways – from bringing a major boost to the economy, job creation and manufacturing skills to habitat and wildlife protection and conservation. When the US Fish And


Wildlife Service conducted a survey in 2011, it found that more than 13.7 million over 16 (that’s six per cent of the population) went hunting that year, spending a grand total of $38.3 billion on equipment, licences, trips and more.


Tat means that each hunter, on


average, contributes around $2,800 per year to the nation’s coffers. Add in two million or more youngsters who rely on a parent to spend on their behalf and the figures are truly eye watering. Tis pastime helps keep more than 680,000 people in jobs, either


40 www.guntradeworld.com


full or part-time, and in some areas actually keeps the economy and small businesses alive. Chris Dolnack, the senior


vice-president and chief marketing officer for trade body the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), said: “Even in today’s urbanised America, hunting continues to be a vital part of our culture. “Hunter spending is the


lifeblood of countless small businesses in rural communities nationwide and hunters make up the main source of wildlife conservation funding through their purchases of licences, firearms and ammunition.” Te HunterSurvey for 2015


showed that 70 per cent of respondents bought ammunition during the year, 45 per cent purchased accessories, 36 per cent bought firearms, a third spent money on clothing, a quarter on


optics and 30 per cent on gun storage solutions. Across the USA, the most popular quarry is whitetail deer, followed by small game (rabbits, squirrels), turkeys, predators, waterfowl, upland game birds, hogs and, finally, doves.


IN THE PINK


Te first part of this feature last month suggested a large rise in the number of women getting involved in hunting. In fact, there were just 1.8


million female hunters in 2001. Today that figure is more than double.


Although the most important


reason women are taking up guns is down to self or home defence, those surveyed by the NSSF have revealed that learning to hunt came in second, with the desire to go shooting with friends and family firmly in third spot.


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