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117 Site waste management will feature as a topic in the site environmental induction, which all staff working on site must attend, which will be supplemented by Tool Box Talks (TBT‟s).


10.3 Monitoring


118 Monitoring of waste arisings, transfers and disposals will be monitored by the appointed Contractor(s) through the Site Waste Management Plan. Day to day monitoring waste storage facilities will be undertaken by the by the Contractor‟s environmental management representative and ECW throughout the construction phase as set out in the EMP.


11 Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources 11.1 Objectives 119


The main objectives with regards to managing potential surface water and foul water drainage are as follows:


To protect surface and groundwater by ensuring that appropriate measures are in place to prevent contaminants from entering the surrounding environment and in particular pathways that might lead to water receptors. An overview of proposed controls for hazardous materials is provided in Section 8 above


To ensure the protection of watercourses during wet and dry open cut watercourse crossings


To ensure protection of fish during open cut crossings


To comply with relevant legislation and good practice in terms of managing surface and foul water abstractions and discharges To maintain and protect private water supplies during construction.


11.2 General Provisions 120


To minimise potential impacts from the construction phase on land, surface water or groundwater receptors, EA ONE and contractors appointed to work on behalf of EA ONE will adhere to relevant Environment Agency‟s Pollution Prevention Guidance (PPG) notes, as well as general good construction practice, including:


PPG01 – General guide to the prevention of water pollution Outline Code of Construction Practice . Version 3. Page 35


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