This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
9.3 Monitoring 112


The mitigation measures described above will be monitored by the Contractor‟s environmental management representative and ECW throughout the construction phase as set out in the EMP. If non-conformity with any of the mitigation measures is identified, it will be recorded during a site audit and appropriate remedial actions will be implemented.


10 Waste Management 10.1 Objectives 113 EAOL aims to manage waste in accordance with: legislative requirements


the waste hierarchy by avoiding waste generation and promoting waste minimisation in the first instance. Where waste is produced, reuse, recycle or recovery should be considered where practical and economically feasible prior to considering disposal.


10.2 Control Measures


114 A project Site Waste Management Plan will be developed in line with legislation and best practice and this will record the following information, as a minimum: The types and quantities of waste generated


The management approach for each waste type (Reuse, Recycle, Recover, Dispose) including any treatment The storage arrangements for each waste type The site waste monitoring and reporting arrangements.


115 Site waste will be segregated as far as practical (and at minimum to separate hazardous wastes) and stored in labelled and secure facilities.


116


Duty of Care requirements in relation to the storage, transfer and disposal of waste will be complied with. Site waste management and environmental, health and safety plans will be prepared in advance of all construction or other disruptive site works. All personnel will be fully trained in these matters to ensure compliance.


Outline Code of Construction Practice . Version 3. Page 34


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61