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Ways to Increase Arc-On Time and Throughput in the Welding Operation Tracks


track, in real time, whether the changes they’ve implemented are actually benefiting the welding operation.


For example, an AWIM system can track deposition rates to help determine how much more efficient a welding operation could be using a different filler metal, such as metal-cored wire — a product capable of increasing deposition rates and travel speeds, typically by 15 to 20 percent or more. These systems can then examine arc-on times and compare the entire cycle time of the job with old cycle times to calculate exactly how much more productive the operation is after such a filler metal conversion.


It is important to analyze all of these factors, as there could be scenarios where higher deposition rates will actually result in less arc-on time because of the faster travel speeds. In this scenario, the goal would be to maintain the current arc on time along with the higher deposition rates that can yield lower cycle times and increase productivity.


Setting parameters and gaining efficiencies


AWIM systems can help companies improve the overall quality of their products by ensuring welding operators follow the proper


standards and guidelines. They can monitor and help control heat input, reduce distortion, and minimize over- or under-welding conditions by tracking weld duration and deposition, thereby reducing labor costs and filler metal waste, and improving throughput.


For instance, if a welding operator needs to make a 10-inch weld, one can calculate — based on the size, length, and wire feed speed — how much time that weld should take to complete. Management can program the AWIM system to give welding operators a window of time to complete the weld so they are not above or below the prescribed duration. Doing this ensures that 1) the weld is in place and 2) that the weld is properly sized. These systems also help prevent under- or over-welding by monitoring the weld deposit. Since some welding procedures allow for a wire feed speed range, and operators might prefer running at different wire feed speeds within that range, a company could set the system to track deposition instead of tracking duration and achieve the same result.


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March/April 2016


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