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WATER TESTING


a full recommendation based report. Previously only available as an in-store lab, in 2014 the WaterLink Spin is going mobile. Specifically designed for the pool service engineer, the portable WaterLink Spin is faster, simpler and more accurate than anything that has gone before in the pool and spa water testing market. Utilising Bluetooth technology, the portable spin delivers test results directly to the engineer’s android device. With 3G or wireless connectivity on-site the pool service engineer can also have fast access to Cloud based Spin-Lab software which allows a full recommendation report to be sent to the engineer’s android within seconds.


PALINTEST VIBRANT DEVELOPMENT


Choosing the right partner for water testing has never been so important. Having both a strong historical track record and a vibrant development programme delivers the best of both worlds.


2014 will be another year of development for Palintest with a number of new products for their pool and spa customers, all focused on sharing the knowledge built up over more than a half of a century of water testing expertise.


Adding wireless connectivity to the Pooltest 25 and Pooltest 9 instruments is only the start; the data exchanged is where the greatest advances will be seen. Transmit data from the Pooltest 25 to one of Palintest’s range of new applications to gain real-time information on pool status. Synchronise instrument data with your smartphone, using the device GPS to tag results geographically for on-site servicing. Suitable for all tablet and mobile devices, the new wireless connectivity uses the latest low energy protocol to minimise power consumption. Residential customers will also benefit from new applications such as Water Balance calculators and all users can enjoy access to


Parameters Of Water Balance pH


pH is a measure of the acidity of the water. The pH scale goes from 0 to 14, where pH 7 is neutral. If the pH is above 7 the water is alkaline; if it is below 7 the water is acidic. The optimum pH for pool water is 7.4, as this is the same as the pH in human eyes and mucous membranes. A pH of 7.4 also gives prime chlorine disinfection. The guideline pH figure is 7.2-7.6.


Low pH: Aggressive water, which can damage the mechanical components of the pool or hot tub, irritate eyes and mucous membranes and cause damage to pool liners. High pH: Less effective chlorine disinfection, skin irritation, scale formation and cloudy water. To lower the pH, add sodium bisulphate; to raise it add sodium carbonate.


TOTAL ALKALINITY (TA) Total alkalinity is a measure of the amount of alkaline substances in the water. This can cause the pH of the water to behave in an uncontrolled manner. A low TA makes the water aggressive and causes pH fluctuations. A high TA makes the pH difficult to adjust and causes cloudiness and lime precipitation. The guideline figure is 80-140ppm in pools and 80-150ppm in hot tubs. Total alkalinity is reduced with sodium bisulphate and increased with sodium bicarbonate.


the interactive support information available on the new Palintest website. Fads may come and go but Palintest remains a key provider of pool water testing for both major sporting events, home hot tubs and all points in between.


A SPECTRUM OF TESTING PRODUCTS Whether it’s a spa, a small domestic pool or a large commercial leisure centre, Golden Coast’s wide range of water testing products


In Pools And Hot Tubs IT IS OF COURSE NECESSARY TO KNOW WHAT THE CORRECT LEVELS ARE TO KEEP POOL OR HOT TUB WATER IN BALANCE IN SIMPLE TERMS THESE ARE AS FOLLOWS:


CALCIUM HARDNESS (CH) The calcium hardness is a measure of the amount of lime dissolved in the water. Water with a CH of less than 100ppm is described as soft water and draws lime out of, for example, the concrete and tile grouting, leading to disintegration. The water is also aggressive. Water with a CH above 300ppm is referred to as hard water and causes lime to be precipitated. Lime precipitation causes scale to form on the walls and pipes of the pool and within the operating equipment. The guideline figure is 100- 275ppm depending on pool finish and between 100-200ppm in hot tubs. The calcium hardness can be reduced by dilution with fresh mains water and increased with calcium chloride.


TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS In domestic pools the level should not rise above 1,500ppm. In public pools PWTAG recommends that the level should not be more than 1,000ppm above the mains water. In hot tubs the maximum is 1,500ppm over that of the water supply.


SANITISING


It is imperative to maintain the correct level of sanitiser in the pool or hot tub and the recommended level for chlorine in pools is 0.5-1.5ppm. Hot tubs are usually sanitised using bromine and the optimum level for this is between 3-6ppm.


has everything you need to keep the quality in check – from simple dip-test strips to the most advanced of electronic photometers. The most basic – and yet accurate and effective – items include FROG test strips for users of FROG water treatment systems, which measure pH and alkalinity. A similarly simple aid is Insta-Test Plus, with which you can gain an instant reading for free chlorine or bromine by simply swirling a test strip in the water three times. Other choices include Lovibond Pooltester kits, which can be


The Pooltest 9 from


Palintest www.swimmingpoolnews.co.uk


“NEW TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATING STATE OF THE ART SOFTWARE HAS MADE TESTING FASTER AND SIMPLER ALLOWING THE POOL OWNER OR OPERATOR TO BE SURE OF ACCURACY WITH THE RESULTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS CONVEYED TO A SMART- PHONE USING WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY”


SPN February 2014 71


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