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TUNING IN OR JUST CREEPY? FACIAL RECOGNITION


Understanding consumers’ true feelings and motivations has been the concern of neuromarketers for some years: what we say we want and what we really want are often two completely different – and sometimes contradictory – things. Understanding customers’ true feelings and motiva- tions gives valuable insights. Now, facial gesture reconition and


profi ling software is coming to market which is enabling retailers to identify mood and respond accordingly. Coffee brand Douwe Egberts conducted a PR stunt by installing a coffee vending machine at Johannes- burg’s OR Tambo Airport: travellers got a free cup when the facial recognition software detected them yawning. We expect theme parks, stadiums and other high-footfall facilities to deploy facial-recognition software both to profi le customers’ age and sex and to assess their mood before and after specifi c experiences. This will enable better product development and give insights into operational variables.


Apps with recordings by Linon Medien at the Bernisches Historisches Museum, Switzerland


SHIFTING THE COST OF TECH BYOD & BYOW


Bring Your Own Device and Bring Your Own Wearables will become familiar terms, as tech companies and operators shift the cost of aquiring hardware to the consumer and concentrate on providing the apps needed to create experiences. Smartphones are opening up oppor- tunities for increased profi ts by passing costs back to users: we’ve seen this in systems such as Sonos, which couples a


wireless speaker with a proprietory app, enabling listeners to use mobile devices as controllers to play MP3 fi les. This approach can be seen increasingly in museums, which are investing in apps as an addition to more traditonal audioguides. We expect operators to continue to fi nd


creative ways to take advantage of the BYOD and BYOW trend to engage with customers, extend the experience beyond the physical confi nes of the facility as well as to drive down costs and offer a more customisable and customised experiences.


✪ ABOUT THE AUTHOR


LIZ TERRY Editor, Leisure Management lizterry@leisuremanagement.co.uk twitter @elizterry Liz Terry, MD of Leisure Media, is a business journalist who’s been writing about the global leisure industries since 1983. She’s editor of Leisure Management and the Leisure Handbook.


CROWDFUNDING


THE NEW PATRONS Crowdfunding websites such as Kickstart- er – which launched in the US in 2009, Eu- rope in 2012 and Canada and Australia in 2013 – are transforming the funding of art and culture projects. In the US Kickstarter beats government funding for the arts. ● See Kickstarter in Leisure Management issue 1 2012: http://bit.ly/1jPnstR


22 LEISURE HANDBOOK 2014


TONGUE TICKLING


LIVING FOOD Living Food – a concept from biology, and robotics student Minsu Kim – proposes the addition of live organisms to fi ne dining. She foresees a time where we move beyond the oyster to where “a vegetable plays with your fork, while noodles tickle your tongue as you eat them,” and plates of food become living, pulsating things.


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