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DEATH END OF LIFE CARE


There’s an increasing interest in having a ‘good death’ which avoids unnecessary medical intervention. With an ageing pop- ulation, the number of people dying each year is increasing, making it a major growth market. This gives experts and operators in


the spa and hospitality industries an opportunity to develop a new category of specialist, spa-inspired facilities, focused on death. They would give people the chance to refl ect and spend time with loved ones, while offering com- fort, personal care, appropriate ritual and a spiritual dimension. We believe end of life care is a market which is ripe for disruption.


Jon Wright’s Xercise4Less is building health clubs in Tesco’s redundant food retail space NEW PARTNERSHIPS


NEXT GEN CUSTOMERS NEW BRANDS


When IKEA announced it was working with Marriott to roll out 150 hotels under its recently created Moxy brand, it marked a new departure for both: IKEA is the money behind the roll-out, while Marriott is operating. Three star Moxy is targeted at Millennials (16 to 34-year-olds), and uses design and technology to deliver elements valued by this age group, while trimming costs with edge of town locations and smaller rooms, made possible by tight design. We expect to see more unexpected, mould-breaking partnerships opening up opportunities in the market. ● See Moxy in Leisure Management issue 4 2013 http://bit.ly/1a5eakV


14 LEISURE HANDBOOK 2014


RETAIL + LEISURE It’s a bloodbath on the high street in many developed nations, as internet shopping disrupts the entire sector. This shift is leaving some large retailers with excess fl oor space which was developed before the boom in online retail and which simply isn’t needed any more. The challenge applies to high street, edge of town and out of town locations. Retailers are looking for ways to monetise this redundant space and the lei- sure industry is providing some of the most creative solutions from cinemas to gyms. Health club operator Xercise4Less is one company at the forefront, with the announcement it’s signed a deal with global food retailer Tesco to open 100 health clubs in its stores over the next three years.


The Tesco/Xercise4Less deal hits two sweet spots: fi rstly, the health club oper- ator will take up unneeded space within Tesco stores and secondly – in a market which is turning into a land-grab – the deal will enable it to roll out clubs quickly and cheaply without the ususal headaches of site-fi nding and complex, time consuming infrastructure development. It also gives Xercise4Less a signifi cant captive market of Tesco customers who – it’s predicted – will be able to combine their shopping visit with a workout. John Wright, MD of Xercise4Less, says the deal is the most signifi cant to have been brokered in the history of the UK health and fi tness industry. We expect further leisure/retail tie ups to emerge, as these sectors work to exploit powerful synergies.


Retailers are looking for ways to monetise the redundant space created by e-commerce and leisure is providing the most creative solutions


www.leisurehandbook.com


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