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Broadcasting still generates the majority of income from media rights


similar to gate revenues at 2.6 per cent CAGR, generating revenues of US$20.1bn (£12.9bn, E15.1bn) in 2015, up from US$17.6bn (£11.3bn, E13.2bn) in 2010. Sports clubs are seeing a larger


proportion of their merchandise transactions moving online, which allows them to engage and interact with fans who can’t attend matches – including those living in other countries. This engagement helps to promote sports brands in those regions and markets and builds demand for media coverage of the clubs involved.


LOOKING FORWARD With reference to what the future might hold for the sports market in a world of increasing economic and political uncertainty, PwC predicts the following: • Growth will come from the emerging sports markets in the BRIC countries


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and the Middle East, which will continue to offer scope for the development of new commercial opportunities – both in domestic and international sports events. • Sponsors will demand more sophisticated measurement techniques to demonstrate their return on investment. • Sports bodies and associations must, and will, introduce new regulations to control the cost base and levels of debt in their sports – to leave a sustainable business model for future generations. • Sports bodies must balance the increased commercial demands of their sports with the need to maintain the integrity and unpredictability that make sporting competitions so exciting and appealing to their supporters. • Across the world we’re seeing ever closer convergence between the sport and entertainment industries as both


sectors rise to the challenges brought by digital technologies, which are changing and shaping the way we spend our leisure time. This new digital environment is signifi cantly contributing to the globalisation of both the industry and specifi c sports. ●


✪ ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Julie Clark leads the sport and leisure practice at PwC in the UK and is a member of PwC’s Global Hospitality and Leisure Practice. She advises governments and investors on major events and capital projects. TEL: +44 (0)20 7213 4170


From Sports Management Issue 1 2012, p20


READ MORE ONLINE CLICK HERE LEISURE HANDBOOK 2014 111


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